UCSF Presentation Template

Closed Captioning To view close captioning for todays webinar, you will need to open a separate window or web browser than you are using for the webinar. You can also view it from a mobile device. At the start time for the webinar, please copy the link below into your browser: http://www.captionedtext.com and please enter the confirmation number: 2619666 If you have any difficulty with the close captioning please send a chat message to AAMC meetings or send an email to The AAMC Group on

Student Affairs is pleased to introduce our speakers today: Joan Bisagno, PhD Stanford University Barbara Hammer, MEd University of Missouri Neera R. Jain, MS, CRC University of California, San Francisco Auckland Disability Law Centre Tim Montgomery, MA Northwestern University Coalition for Disability Access in

Graduate Health Science and Medical Education Please use the Q&A panel located on the right hand side of your screen to submit your questions. Send to All Panelists. Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education The Coalition wishes to thank the AAMC and for their generous support in developing this webinar

series. Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education Separating Fact from Fiction: Debunking Disability Myths and Addressing Legitimate Concerns Possibility is ultimately defined by an individual; whereas, limitations are

often defined by society. - Christopher Read, Former Assistive Technology Specialist 6 Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education 01/25/2020 Overview Introduce 4 prevailing myths about students with disabilities studying medicine Dispel each myth by discussing the reality of the experiences of students with disabilities

Discuss the legitimate concerns that underlie each myth Explain best practices to provide access without diminishing outcomes for students and patients Questions 7 Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education 01/25/2020 Myth #1: Students with disabilities cannot fulfill

the rigorous requirements of medical programs. 8 Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education 01/25/2020 Myth #1: Dispelling The Myth All students must meet the same academic and technical requirements and standards as their non disabled peers - with or without accommodations

Academic and technical standards provide a clear guide for what is deemed essential How students will meet those standards begins the discussion about accommodations 9 Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education 01/25/2020 Myth #1: Addressing Legitimate Concerns When accommodations conflict with standards start a discussion

Reasoned deliberations must take place to determine if the requested accommodations would fundamentally alter the program Discuss the unique qualities of the requested accommodation Consider alternative accommodations Essentialness must be more than tradition 10 Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education 01/25/2020 Myth #1: Scenario

Student with a well-documented history of severe chronic health condition that results in frequent, extended hospitalizations Student qualified for, and frequently used, accommodations through undergraduate career Prior to starting medical school, student requests the following accommodations: Leniency in absence policies Make up exams and homework for time missed Extra tutoring to cover missed material 11 Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education 01/25/2020

Myth #2: Providing accommodations to students with disabilities compromises patient safety. 12 Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education 01/25/2020 Myth #2: Dispelling The Myth

Patient safety is one of the most fundamental aspects of health care: accommodations should never compromise safety. Patient safety concerns must be reasonable, legitimate and well informed. Clinical setting safety policies, procedures and checks should be in place for all medical professionals 13 Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education 01/25/2020

Myth #2: Addressing Legitimate Concerns Each clinical setting should have specific safety requirements that must be evaluated individually Clinical settings that have direct impact on the body may have much more stringent levels of safety required Open communication and a team approach is essential to evaluate any proposed threat to safety 14 Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education

01/25/2020 Myth #2: Scenario Student enters medical school with no identified disability Midway through M2 develops disability Accommodations include: 50% extended time on exams; 15-minute rest breaks off the clock for every 1.5 hours of testing Student now entering 3rd year clerkships Medication side effects and functional limitations: mild headache hand tremor (side effect of medication) 15

Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education 01/25/2020 Myth #3: Accommodations in the clinical setting do not prepare students for the real world. 16 Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education

01/25/2020 Myth #3: Dispelling The Myth Universities are educational institutions not employers Accommodations are available in the work place Reasonableness of accommodations can differ between academic and clinical settings In most cases, we cannot deny an accommodation simply because it may not be available in the workplace, licensing exams, etc. 17 Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education

01/25/2020 Myth #3: Addressing Legitimate Concerns Technical standards grounded in the current world of work should be upheld Essential skills should relate directly to the reality of the workplace Workplace opportunities would be extremely limited if these skills were eliminated 18 Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education

01/25/2020 Myth #3 Scenario Student requests accommodation of extended time for OSCE School initially says no citing: patient load management, licensing exam expectations, scheduling barriers Explore exam objectives: What is being measured? Discrete portions of exam: preparation, patient encounter, charting Accommodations available on USMLE Step 2 Human variation in medical practice Reality of 1.5 ext time = 3 minutes, not 1 hour Outcome: Requests reviewed case by case Pre-book additional day for exams with accommodations

19 Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education 01/25/2020 Myth #4: Students with disabilities cannot handle the intensity of health science programs. 20

Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education 01/25/2020 Myth #4: Dispelling The Myth Same successes and challenges as their non-disabled peers Inherent stressors of medical school Divorce/relationship difficulties Financial struggles Family/personal acute/chronic health challenges Academic difficulties; some for the first time Students with disabilities have no more or less ability to handle the intensity of the programs, but need to feel

supported by the school so they: Can develop resiliency and coping strategies to use in the future Don't hesitate to disclose and forgo support and assistance. 21 Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education 01/25/2020 Myth #4: Addressing Legitimate Concerns Avoid making stereotyped assumption about a particular disability Base concerns on actual student performance, not assumptions about students ability re: disability

Coordinate campus resources to address the challenges of all students Proactively address academic support, mental and physical health, self care, and work life balance 22 Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education 01/25/2020 Myth #4 Scenario Student enters medical school. Family lives with the student; parents, spouse (could not work for temporary health reasons), 2 young children

All household responsibilities falling on the student shoulders. Limited time to study and prepare academically. Begins to struggle academically; students academic success has been a significant part of the student identity Financial limitations and restrictions; while the student is seen as the primary provider Student feels immensely overwhelmed and begins to contemplate suicide. 23 Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education 01/25/2020

Questions? 24 Coalition for Disability Access in Graduate Health Science and Medical Education 01/25/2020 Resources To join the List-Serv contact: Leigh Culley at [email protected] For more information on the Coalition go to: sds.ucsf.edu/coalition To order the book visit:

Save 20% www.springerpub.com Promo code: AF1504 Be sure to register for the next webinar Clinical Accommodations: Upholding Standards While Creating Equal Access (7/9/15) Details and Registration can be found www.aamc.org/gsa

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • Work-Group for Community Health Workers

    Work-Group for Community Health Workers

    Roles Reconfiguration - Discussion. Role #3: Service System Navigation: (8)Providing referral and follow-up services or otherwise coordination of human services options. (9) Proactively identifying and referring individuals in federal, state, private or nonprofit health and human services programs.
  • Title Slide - Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

    Title Slide - Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction

    Abusing or Neglecting a Child? Report neglect only if it involves a caregiver. Report emotional damage only if parents are suspected of not seeking treatment the student needs. Report physical or sexual abuse regardless of who is suspected of being...
  • Introduction to Programming - Stanford University

    Introduction to Programming - Stanford University

    Bank allows money transfer only if customer's machine runs "up-to-date" OS patches. Enterprise allows laptop to connect to its network only if laptop runs "authorized" software. Gamers can join network only if their game client is unmodified. DRM: MusicStoresells content...
  • Lesson 35 Powerpoint (text version)

    Lesson 35 Powerpoint (text version)

    BALL BASEBALL BASKETBALL BOWLING CHASE CLIMB DOLL FOOTBALL GAME-[challenge] HOCKEY KITE MOTORCYCLE ROLLER-BLADE-[ice-skate, roller-skate] RUN-[...] SNOW-BOARD SOCCER SOFTBALL SWING VIDEO = MOVIE Dr. Bill Vicars Lifeprint.com Practice sheet 35.C CHILDREN CHILD NEED = must should have-to how-OLD OLD SWINGING /...
  • What is Economics?

    What is Economics?

    capital. The hammer, screwdriver and saw are each previously manufactured goods. These pieces are being used by the carpenter to create a table. ... Jennifer Hyman and Jenny Fleiss. Each of these people is an entrepreneur. They all made it...
  • October 29 Planner Record todays assignments and homework.

    October 29 Planner Record todays assignments and homework.

    October 30. Planner. Record today's assignments and homework. Warm Up. Study . Knowsys. Read AR. Vocabulary. Knowsys - Crossword. Grammar/Writing - Personal Narrative
  • Investor Roadshow - OLIF

    Investor Roadshow - OLIF

    OLIF V2 Gr. Thurmair April 2000
  • Dealing with Attendance issues

    Dealing with Attendance issues

    There might be a few occasions when someone needs to take some time off in the day to handle something that can only be dealt with during business hours. Just make sure they do not take advantage of this gesture....