Report Writing Workshop #1 - WordPress.com

Now that the writing race has started, do you have any concerns? How is the teamwork going? Class 5 June 26th Monday 1) Writing Workshop #2 (Cog summary) 2) Collaborative Write/EditCognitive Tables 3) Check Out New Assessments Test Day Prep -PRACTICE Class 6 June 28th Wednesday 1) Creating a Learner Profile 1) Tutorials PRACTICE (Douglas) Applicable to YOUR TESTS! 2) Review Draft 1 Checklist your test day Mandatory 3) Peer Review Cog. Reading:

Summary Chapter 7: 4) PRACTICE 5) Collaborative Write 6) Working on Case Learner Profiles 7) PRACTICE--Test Workshops-CRI, CELF, Slingerland JULY 1 Saturday Video Due: Lecture Cog. tables for peer PRACTICE 1) Two Intro YOUR TESTS! review Lectures to QUIZ: Online quiz #3 Academic If you think youve BRING: Areas 1)laptops practiced

enough, 2) Video 2)binders go one more hour. Tutorial of 3)testing materials for YOUR practice subtests Due: Cognitive summary for peer review (print cognitive scores as well) BRING: 1)laptops 2)binders 3)testing materials for practice ***** INTERN TESTING DAY 2***** 9:00 a.m. 11:30 a.m. testing; 11:30-1:30 p.m. data analysis BRING YOUR TESTING SCHEDULE Class Agenda

In class Writing Workshop In teams(5:30) Peer Review and editing within teams Writing Cognitive Summary Test Day Prep (Check out new materials & make testing schedule) In Practice groups (7:30) Practice Review new materials Workshops: CELF, CRI, SLINGERLAND (if time permits) Writing Workshop 2b: The Cognitive Summary Sped 576 Summer 2017 The Cognitive Summary Rubric > Categories 4 3

2 1 Points Draft 1: Introductory Sections & Cognitive Results Content CC3G, CC3K Organization/ Mechanics Background and observation (daily routine), academic history are clearly and accurately discussed. WJ Cognitive section is complete with an objective summary. Most content included, needs more

information/clarific ation in any area. Writing was not completely objective. An entire section At least half of the is missing or following sections needs are missing: considerable background, revision. Heavy observation, use of jargon academic, WJ (i.e., subtest cognitive. names). Strict adherence to prescribed format, including accurate spelling and grammar Mostly adhered to prescribed format

evident, spelling and grammar. Lack of adherence to format, spelling and grammar Substantial revisions needed in: format, spelling/grammar /28 /4 What do you notice about the writing? Cognitive Processing Summary: M worked quickly and accurately on tasks she was proficient in. She performed well on items that required her to process visual symbols: manipulating visual images in her head, determining rules that grouped images together, and visually sorting through numerical data. After silently reading a story, without time constraints, M successfully recalled

information presented in the story. She also successfully recalled and reversed number sequences of up to four numbers, that were presented orally. Recalling and re-ordering sequences containing both objects and numbers was more difficult for her. Similarly, she struggled to mentally hold and manipulate spoken words. She was also unable to create new words by mentally interchanging sounds; a skill connected to sounding out unfamiliar words while reading. Overall, M did well when working with visuals; She did not do well with tasks that were presented orally and required her to mentally complete multi-step directions or processes. Overview for Writing the Cognitive Summary e v i t i n 1. Gather the materials you need g o C x i d

2. Analyze test performanceJ n e W p e p a) Strengths h A t e e t h b) Needs t e l n p i m e c) Patterns l o

b C a t 3. Write the Summary t s e t a) Topic sentence b) Body c) Closing/Summary statement 4. Edit and Rewrite 5. Weave in or make clear the theme for your summary Cognitive Summary Writing Step 1: Gather Materials You will need the following for writing: 1. Score Report or Complete Cognitive Table in Appendix (for comparison) 2. Cognitive Summary Tables (for reference)

3. Cog. Proc. Jigsaw Article (for wording) 4. Previous Sample Report (for Style) 5. Workshop 2 handout (this ppt. for guidance) Cognitive Summary Writing Step 2: Analysis Break down test performance: Identify strengths, needs and patterns. You will write using these terms. Do not identify by subtest names, think about skills that are represented. You will want to group similar skills together. Be clear and concise in your analysis of performance. It is important that your summary is reflective in order to come up with a clear description of a childs strengths and needs in the area of evaluation. Try your best not to use jargon (terms someone outside the field would not know); If there is a term you need to use that could be considered jargon, just write a brief explanation of the term within the sentence Cognitive Summary Writing Step 3a: Write Intro Write one to two intro sentence as an indication of overall

performance in the area. Sentence 1: Usually, you will make a statement about the students behavior or attitude during this areas of testingespecially if affect/behavior may have impacted performance. Sentence 2: Write a sentence about their general performance in this area. For example Xs cognitive skills were mostly in the average range. X demonstrated both average and below average skills in the area of cognitive processing. Xs processing skills varied widely from significantly below average, for most, to above average. Note: You will be more eloquent and avoid jargon. Cognitive Summary Writing Step 3b: Write Body & Closing Write ContentYou are writing overarching statements about the childs strengths and needs based on your analyses of each subtest When wither clear strengths and/or needs are missing then you will write about relative strengths and needs Relative needs will be areas for possible enrichment Write 1 or 2 closing/summary statements.In this statement you will give an overall representation of their skills. List skills they were and were not able to do. Group related skills. Allude to the theme of the paperwhat you think we need to highlight that is leading the reader to know the final

determination before they reach the final conclusion (i.e. fit the profile of) Topic Sentence, Strengths, Needs, and Closing Cognitive Processing Summary: M demonstrated both strengths and needs in this are of testing; she worked quickly and accurately on tasks she was proficient in. She performed well on items that required her to process visual symbols: manipulating visual images in her head, determining rules that grouped images together, and visually sorting through numerical data. After silently reading a story, without time constraints, M successfully recalled information presented in the story. She also successfully recalled and reversed number sequences of up to four numbers, that were presented orally. Recalling and re-ordering sequences containing both objects and numbers was more difficult for her. Similarly, she struggled to mentally hold and manipulate spoken words. She was unable to create new words by mentally interchanging sounds; a skill connected to sounding out unfamiliar words while reading. Overall, M did well when working with visuals; She did not do well with tasks that were presented orally and required her to mentally complete multi-step directions or processes. Sample terms for describing strengths & needs ? s

e l p Well, Exceptionally well m a Successfully x er e e w Area of strength h e t r d l o o u t M o a Average c

h s W m Proficient r e t e? Able to s Below & Significantly Below Averageu Above & Significantly Above Average Struggled with Had difficulty with Was challenging Unable to Area of concern

Another example of a cognitive summary Cognitive Processing Summary: Aden consistently worked and remained on task for long periods of time, despite having mostly below average skills in this area. He had a relatively strong ability to recall information he had listened to, such as a story or a list of items. When visuals such as pictures or symbols were paired with auditory information he was able to recall that information. He regularly struggled with transitioning to new or complex directions, typically requiring multiple practice samples with a new task before understanding the expectations of that task. This was particularly challenging for him while holding information in his short-term memory. Also, utilizing vocabulary and general background knowledge to answer questions was difficult for Aden. Across tasks he was often descriptive, but not specific enough to be correct, demonstrating word find issues. Phonological awareness was another area of concern; he struggled to identify sounds in the middle and ends of words and to quickly recall words from his memory that began with certain sounds. Problem solving presented itself as an area of need, specifically his inductive reasoning skills. He struggled to follow multistep directions and extract necessary information to solve problems. Overall, it was apparent that he could recall details but struggled with synthesizing and manipulating information, a pattern that was seen throughout testing. Alluding statement Integrating Examples

Most examples will be in the tables/charts of the report, but you can write some in the summary paragraph if specific examples really drive home your message Despite difficulty with increasingly challenging words, Joe attempted to read all words presented to him. Most of Joes incorrect answers were due to mispronunciation of letter combinations or leaving out letters in the middle or end of a word. For example, for mathematician, Joe said, mathematic s. Grouping skills & making connectionsDuring one subtest, Joe tried to sound out each word phonetically. This approach worked well for some of the items; his errors mostly resulted from the mispronunciation of letter combinations. Joes ability to sound out words suggested he had some knowledge of phonics, even though he demonstrated limited sight-word vocabulary. Note: These types of connections/observations will guide you in planning the DA. Making connections Another example of making connections between subtests and tasks: Recalling and re-ordering sequences containing both objects and numbers was more difficult for her. Similarly, she struggled to mentally hold and manipulate spoken words. She was unable to create new words by mentally interchanging sounds; a skill connected

to sounding out unfamiliar words while reading. Note: These types of observations will guide us in creating dynamic assessments and writing recommendations. Cognitive Summary Writing Step 4: Edit & rewriteMake sure you are writing formally, clearly & concisely (every word counts) group skills checking for accuracy, consistency & contradictions varying your sentence starters writing smooth transition between strengths and needs Transition Statements-Usually connect skills that they were and were not able to do. More to keep in mind when editing & rewriting Write as if you were talking to the childs parent

It should be easy to understand Talk about skills and performance not subtests Do not use jargon or subtest names Try to be sensitive If there is a jargon term you need to use, then write a brief explanation of the term within the sentence. See the Self Editing Checklists for additional writing tips! More to keep in mind when editing & rewriting ITALICIZE all directions provided by the examiner & put anything said by the child in QUOTES. Vary terminology so that its not repetitive but accurate. Some words for good performance (but not limited to): performed well, an area of strength, good memory. Some words for poor performance: struggled, had difficulty, performed poorly, was an area of need. Check that you have written a summary for the cognitive section that uses skills not subtest names. Delete all highlighted or italicized directions in the draft Check for proper formatting. More to keep in mind when

editing & rewriting Address contradictions Remember, background, tables, and summaries should all match . So if there are contradictions, then write about them You could write something like Mom reported fine motor difficulties, but none were observed during testing. and then provide evidence. Cognitive Summary Writing Step 5: Weave in or make clear the theme for your summary Each summary (background, behavioral observations, cognitive, etc.) should allude to an underlying theme. The theme will build towards the final fit the profile of statement Final Finding: Assessments indicated that T fit the profile of child with ADHD (Inattentive and Hyperactive-Impulsive). Alluding statements: Ts ability to focus varied throughout this area of testing. On multiple occasions, she needed to be redirected on multiple occasions. She appeared more focused when items were presented visually versus orally. During many tasks, T had difficulty remaining focused and paying attention to directions. ActivityRewrite to make it formal, clear, & concise

a. She also successfully was able to look at a picture key that represented words to retrieve information and decode a picture message. b. Carmen also struggled with finding picture pairs continually through other pictures in a long series in a three minute timed test. This test involved decision making processes. She also struggled using multi-steps to define a rule and struggled with two or more rules. Finally she had difficulty finding the matching letters or numbers in a timed decision makingtest. Time to write Oh and dont hold your questions for the night before. EMAIL! TEXT! If you can, get someone to review it (without names), please do. Class 5 June 26th Monday 1) Writing Workshop #2 Video Lecture

(Cog summary) 1) Two Intro PRACTICE YOUR 2) Collaborative Write-Cognitive Lectures to TESTS! Tables Academic 3) Test Day Prep Areas If you think youve 4) PRACTICE 2) Video practiced enough, go Tutorial of one more hour. YOUR subtests Class 6 June 28th Wednesday 1) Creating a Learner Profile (Douglas) 2) Review Draft 1 Checklist 3) Peer Review Cog. Summary 4) PRACTICE 5) Collaborative Write

6) Working on Case Learner Profiles 7) PRACTICE--Test WorkshopsCRI, CELF, Slingerland JULY 1 Saturday Class 7 July 3 Monday 1) Tutorials Applicable to your test day PRACTICE YOUR TESTS! Mandatory Reading: Chapter 7: Due: Cog. tables for peer review QUIZ: Online quiz #3 BRING: 1)laptops 2)binders 3)testing materials for practice

Due: Cognitive summary for peer review BRING: 1)laptops 2)binders 3)testing materials for practice ***** INTERN TESTING DAY 2***** 9:00 a.m. 11:30 a.m. testing; 11:30-1:30 p.m. data analysis BRING YOUR TESTING SCHEDULE 1) Intro to Data Team Meeting 2 Collaborative Assessment Conference 2) Dynamic Assessment Lecture 3) Collaborative Profiling & Writing w/ Results from Intern Testing Days Video Lecture 1) Tutorials Applicable to your test day Mandatory Reading: 1) Compton 2012Cognitive and

Academic Profiles of Reading and Mathematics LD 2) Bedford & Hollinger (2006) PRACTICE YOUR TESTS! DUE: DRAFT 1 Background, Cognitive Tables & Summary-for grading BRING: 1)laptops 2)binders 3)testing materials for practice For Next Class: Due: 1 PRINTED COPY of your COGNITIVE SUMMARY for Peer Review-The appendix table of cognitive scores or a copy of the score report to go with it. Re-Read the Andrew Case Study sections for ease in writing. You may choose another sample paper as well. There is a Mandatory Reading, CHAPTER 7 about learning how to profile, on wordpress site.

Review your new tests-Workshops-CRI, CELF, Slingerland ---Do the video tutorials that pertain to these Get ready for next testing day. WRITE! WRITE! WRITE!

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