REVISING AQA GCSE LANGUAGE, PAPER TWO REVISING AQA

REVISING AQA GCSE LANGUAGE, PAPER TWO REVISING AQA GCSE LANGUAGE, PAPER TWO The English Language GCSE is divided into two papers. Paper One: Explorations in creative reading and writing Paper Two: Writers viewpoints and perspectives PAPER ONE PAPER TWO 50% of GCSE 1 hour 45 minutes 80 marks 40 marks for reading 40 marks for writing 1 source (Fiction)

1 short question (4 marks) 2 longer questions (8 marks) 1 extended question (20 marks) 1 extended writing question (40 marks) 50% of GCSE 1 hour 45 minutes 80 marks 40 marks for reading 40 marks for writing 2 sources (Non-fiction) 1 short question (4 marks) 2 longer questions (8+12 marks) 1 extended question (16 marks) 1 extended writing question (40 marks)

PHASE ONE REVISING INFERENCE AND ANALYSIS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN INFERENCE AND ANALYSIS Inference Analysis Making a prediction about something based on evidence. A detailed examination of the elements in a text. An explanation as to WHY writers do what they do. Analysis includes discussion of the effects writers want to achieve and how they achieve it. Todays key questions:

3. 1. How do I infer from a text in an exam? 2. How do I analyse a text in an exam? What is the difference between inference and analysis? KEY SKILL - INFERENCE INFERENCE Making a prediction about something based on evidence. Look at the image below and predict whatever you can from it. What do you think has happened? Where are the people in this picture? When does this take place? Remember, you MUST be able to back up your ideas with evidence. If you cant, you are speculating rather than inferring. WHEN DO I NEED TO INFER? LANGUAGE AO1: Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas. LITERATURE AO1: Read, understand and respond to

texts. Todays key questions: 1. How do I infer from a text in an exam? 2. How do I analyse a text in an exam? 3. What is the difference between inference and analysis? KEY SKILL - INFERENCE INFERENCE Making a prediction about something based on evidence. WHEN DO I NEED TO INFER? And what can we predict from this picture? Remember, you MUST be able to back up your ideas with evidence. If you cant, you are speculating rather than inferring. ? ? LANGUAGE AO1: Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas.

LITERATURE AO1: Read, understand and respond to texts. ? Todays key questions: 1. How do I infer from a text in an exam? 2. How do I analyse a text in an exam? 3. What is the difference between inference and analysis? CONSIDER THIS What questions would I need to ask if I were analysing the picture instead of inferring from it? Why does the artist decide to capture this event in wide shot? Why does the artist place this man next to the train?

How does the artist want his audience to react when they see this drawing? How do they try and achieve this reaction? Why are we looking at these people from behind? How does the artist intend to portray these people? Why? Todays key questions: 1. How do I infer from a text in an exam? 2. How do I analyse a text in an exam? 3. What is the difference between inference and analysis? READ THE QUESTIONS AND THE SOURCES Read the questions so you know what you are being asked to discuss in your answers.

Read the sources. If you have time, you will want to read the sources twice so you understand their meaning. SOURCE A: The Staplehurst Crash A letter by Charles Dickens SOURCE B: The Paddington Rail Disaster A newspaper article KEY SKILL MAKING INFERENCES AND CompleteSUMMARISING the Inference sheets to help you prepare for this question. This preparation SUMMARY A summary means you need to sum up the text. INFERENCE Making a prediction about something based on evidence. WHEN DO I NEED TO INFER? LANGUAGE AO1: Identify and

interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas. LITERATURE AO1: Read, understand and respond to texts. task only looks at a section of each source but when answering the question fully, you must remember to refer to the entire text. YOUR TASK WRITE UP YOUR SUMMARY SUMMARY A summary means you need to sum up the text. INFERENCE Making a prediction about something based on evidence. WHEN DO I NEED TO INFER? LANGUAGE AO1: Identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas. LITERATURE AO1: Read, understand and respond to texts.

Answer the following question: Refer to Source A and Source B. Write a summary of the differences in the rail disasters they each describe. (8 marks) Remember, all we are doing is summarising and inferring so you do not need to use subject terminology yet or analyse any words. Aim for THREE detailed points. You could start: In Source A, we are told about the immediate aftermath of the rail crash by Dickens who was an eyewitness. He describes how he looked out of the train and there was nothing below but the line of the rail. This implies that the train has crashed in an environment that is unsafe for many of the survivors and that threat to life is not just from the wreckage itself but their surroundings outside of the carriage. This is further emphasised when Dickens describes the actions of the survivors, saying how some people were madly trying to plunge out of the window [unaware] there was an open swampy field 15 feet below them. This may imply On the other hand, the crash in Source B YOUR FEEDBACK Identify areas of your answer you are not particularly confident with. Ask me questions I can respond to when I mark. Look at the example below to help you. Have I punctuated my quotation correctly?

Is my quotation too long here? In Source A, we are told about the immediate aftermath of the rail crash by Dickens who was an eyewitness. He describes how he looked out of the train and there was nothing below but the line of the rail. This implies that the train has crashed in an environment that is unsafe for many of the survivors and that threat to life is not just from the wreckage itself but their surroundings outside of the carriage. This is further emphasised when Dickens describes the actions of the survivors, saying how some people were madly trying to plunge out of the window [unaware] there was an open swampy field 15 feet below them. This may imply On the other hand, the crash in Source B Have I inferred here? Have I included enough inferences in my second paragraph?

CONSIDER THIS Inference Inference AO1: identify and interpret explicit and implicit information and ideas select and synthesise evidence from different texts Analysis AO2: Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects and influence readers, using relevant subject terminology to support their views. AO1: Read, understand and respond to texts. Students should be able to: maintain a critical style and develop an

informed personal response use textual references, including quotations, to support and illustrate Analysis interpretations. AO2: Analyse the language, form and structure used by a writer to create meanings and effects, using relevant subject terminology where appropriate. If all you do in an analysis question is infer, you CANNOT meet Assessment Objective 2. Inference and analysis are different. With inference, we are making predictions (an educated guess) based on information we have. When we analyse, we look at language and structure in far more detail and ask ourselves WHY the writer has used a particular word. We talk about the impact this word or phrase has on a text. You must recognise the differences. DO NOT think you are meeting AO2 by inferring. KEY SKILL ANALYSIS OF LANGUAGE ANALYSIS A detailed examination of the elements in a text. An explanation as to WHY writers do what they do. Analysis includes discussion of the effects writers want to achieve and how they achieve it. WHEN DO I NEED TO ANALYSE?

LANGUAGE AO2: Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects. Use subject terminology. LITERATURE AO2: Analyse the language, form and structure used by a writer to create meanings and effects. Use subject terminology. If inference concerns us with WHAT could be happening, what is analysis? There will always be an element of inference needed when analysing. However, we need to ask ourselves WHY the writers are doing what they do and HOW they do it. Todays key questions: 1. How do I infer from a text in an exam? 2. How do I analyse a text in an exam? 3. What is the difference between inference and analysis? KEY SKILL ANALYSIS EXTRACT #1

ANALYSIS A detailed examination of the elements in a text. An explanation as to WHY writers do what they do. Analysis includes discussion of the effects writers want to achieve and how they achieve it. How do writers create meaning? WHEN DO I NEED TO ANALYSE? LANGUAGE AO2: Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects. Use subject terminology. LITERATURE AO2: Analyse the language, form and structure used by a writer to create meanings and effects. Use subject terminology. Read through Analysis Extract #1 and answer the questions around the grid. You will be working from SOURCE A by Charles Dickens. Todays key questions: 1. How do I infer from a text in an exam? 2. How do I analyse a text in an exam? 3. What is the difference between inference and analysis?

KEY SKILL SINGLE WORD ANALYSIS Refer to Source A. How does Charles Dickens use language to convey his thoughts and feelings about the disaster? (12 marks) Clear Calm Transparent ? Composed ? Red: One key word from the text Yellow: Connotations of the key word in red. Pink: Connotations of the second word (linked to key word) and so on. How can I judiciously select one word to create a multi-layered analysis? Use the coloured circles to strengthen your analysis and discussion of language.

KEY SKILL SINGLE WORD ANALYSIS Refer to Source A. How does Charles Dickens use language to convey his thoughts and feelings about the disaster? (12 marks) Clear Calm Composed Transparent ? ? Charles Dickens discusses how he tried to promote a sense of reassurance to others after the crash. When talking to other victims he says they can all remain composed. Perhaps Dickens uses this adjective to show readers how he remained calm in the immediate aftermath. Although he may have felt terrified of his situation, his thoughts remain clear in order to survive. KEY SKILL SINGLE WORD ANALYSIS Refer to Source A. How does Charles Dickens use language to convey his thoughts and feelings about the disaster? (12 marks)

Choose the words you will discuss in your answer to the question above. Choose judiciously (with good judgement). Remember, if you cannot say more than one thing about each word, you will not want to write about it! Complete your Rainbow Word Analysis sheet. Consider the connotations of each word carefully. Todays key questions: 1. How do I infer from a text in an exam? 2. How do I analyse a text in an exam? 3. What is the difference between inference and analysis? YOUR TASK WRITE UP YOUR ANALYSIS ANALYSIS A detailed examination of the elements in a text. WHEN DO I NEED TO ANALYSE? LANGUAGE AO2: Explain, comment on and analyse how writers use language and structure to achieve effects. Use subject terminology.

LITERATURE AO2: Analyse the language, form and structure used by a writer to create meanings and effects. Use subject terminology. Write up your analysis by answering the following question: Refer to Source A. How does Charles Dickens use language to convey his thoughts and feelings about the disaster? Remember, there will be an element of inference, but your purpose is to discuss the thoughts and feelings of Charles Dickens and HOW/WHY the writer presents them in this way. Aim for FOUR points. You could start: Throughout his letter, Charles Dickens clearly portrays himself as a man who has been shaken by the event he has experienced and yet he is able to relay the thoughts and feelings he went through during the disaster with clarity. He describes himself as shaken, not by the crash itself but from dealing with the dead and dying which he says was horrible. Perhaps Dickens uses the adjective horrible to make readers feel an element of sympathy for him even though he survived. Dickens is obviously haunted by what he has seen. Furthermore Todays key questions: 1. How do I infer from a text in an exam? 2. How do I analyse a text in an exam?

3. What is the difference between inference and analysis? YOUR FEEDBACK Identify areas of your answer you are not particularly confident with. Ask me questions I can respond to when I mark. Look at the example below to help you. Im not sure how to make a clear point here. Is this the correct use of subject terminology? Throughout his letter, Charles Dickens clearly portrays himself as a man who has been shaken by the event he has experienced and yet he is able to relay the thoughts and feelings he went through during the disaster with clarity. He describes himself as shaken, not by the crash itself but from dealing with the dead and dying which he says was horrible. Perhaps Dickens uses the adjective horrible to make readers feel an element of sympathy for him even though he survived. Dickens is obviously haunted by what he has seen. Furthermore

Can you help me with? PHASE TWO - METHODS WHAT IS PERSPECTIVE? What is Barack Obamas perspective on global warming? What is perspective? What is Donald Trumps perspective on global warming? Perspective: a particular attitude towards or way of regarding something; a point of view. Todays key questions: 1. Can I identify the perspectives of a writer in a text?

2. Can I discuss the methods a writer uses to present their perspective? 3. Can I compare methods and perspectives? PAPER TWO, QUESTION FOUR Refer to Source A and Source B. Compare how the writers present their different perspectives of the national railway disasters they describe. In your answer, you should: - compare their different perspectives - compare the methods they use to convey their attitudes - support your ideas with quotations from both texts What are the writers thinking, feeling, imagining and experiencing? What do they do to present these thoughts, feelings and experiences? How do they write to ensure they get these ideas across to their reader? Todays key questions: 1. Can I identify the perspectives of a writer in a text? 2. Can I discuss the methods a writer uses to present their perspective? 3. Can I compare methods and perspectives? PAPER TWO, QUESTION FOUR Question 2 is just about spotting differences and commenting on inferences (what you can work out). Question 4 is a comparison question. Question 4 is about what the writer is

thinking, feeling, imagining and experiencing. It is not just a comparison of anything it is a comparison of the perspectives of the two writers. In your answer, you must discuss the methods the writers choose to show their thoughts, feelings, imaginings and experiences in each text. Todays key questions: 1. Can I identify the perspectives of a writer in a text? 2. Can I discuss the methods a writer uses to present their perspective? 3. Can I compare methods and perspectives? METHODS THEYRE NOT JUST LANGUAGE DEVICES! vices e d e g a u g Lan

Tone of Facts/Opini g o n n i t i s r s e w r d d a t c e r i

D y t i l a rm Purpose of o F text Anecdotes e i as l B o b r e p Ordering of y

V O H P details s Dialogue p (Chronolog u o r g y) Word Todays key questions: 1. Can I identify the perspectives of a writer in a text? 2. Can I discuss the methods a writer uses to present their perspective? 3. Can I compare methods and perspectives? KEY SKILL METHODS EXTRACTS Question 4 is a comparison question. Question 4 is about what

the writer is thinking, feeling, imagining and experiencing. As you read, see if you can track a change in perspective. Remember, your task is to compare. This means you can discuss similarities and differences. Look at what AQA said in their exam report. Try not to just rely on language devices. Students should be encouraged to engage with a wider variety of methods. Read through Methods Extract #1 and #2 and answer the questions around the grid. You will be working from SOURCE A by Charles Dickens. Todays key questions: 1. Can I identify the perspectives of a writer in a text? 2. Can I discuss the methods a writer uses to present their perspective? 3. Can I compare methods and perspectives? YOUR TASK WRITE UP YOUR ANSWER Question 4 is a comparison question. Question 4 is about what the writer is thinking, feeling,

imagining and experiencing. Remember, your task is to compare. This means you can discuss similarities and differences. Look at what AQA said in their exam report. Try not to just rely on language devices. Students should be encouraged to engage with a wider variety of methods. Refer to Source A and Source B. Compare how the writers present their different perspectives of the national railway disasters they describe. You could start: At the beginning of Source A, Charles Dickens clearly feels the train crash has had a long lasting impact on him. He uses a form of direct address when he says, I should have written to you yesterday meaning he wanted to contact sooner but the railway disaster has been at the forefront of his mind. This perspective is further emphasised through Dickens use of On the other hand, Joe Shute, the writer of the article clearly feels Todays key questions: 1. Can I identify the perspectives of a writer in a text?

2. Can I discuss the methods a writer uses to present their perspective? 3. Can I compare methods and perspectives? YOUR FEEDBACK Identify areas of your answer you are not particularly confident with. Ask me questions I can respond to when I mark. Look at the example below to help you. Can I include this as a method? Have I written enough for this method? At the beginning of Source A, Charles Dickens clearly feels the train crash has had a long lasting impact on him. He uses a form of direct address when he says, I should have written to you yesterday meaning he wanted to contact sooner but the railway disaster has been at the forefront of his mind. This perspective is further emphasised through Dickens use of On the other hand, Joe Shute, the writer of the article clearly feels

Is this classified as a perspective? RESOURCES INFERENCES FROM ART INFERENCES FROM ART Charles Dickens feels that. (statement + quotation) Charles Dickens feels that. (statement + quotation) We see this through his use of (method + example/comment) We see this through his use of

(method + example/comment) whereas whereas Joe Shute feels that Joe Shute feels that This view/experience is presented through Shutes use of This view/experience is presented through Shutes use of On the other hand, Dickens On the other hand,

Dickens

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