Lets Ride! Cycling Community Initiation Introduction NCCP Coaching

Lets Ride! Cycling Community Initiation Introduction NCCP Coaching Streams and Contexts Competition Introduction Community Initiation Lets Ride! Instructor Beginner Ready to Race! Competition Development Instructor Intermediate Performance Cycling Community Ongoing Competition High Performance Instructor Advanced Lets Ride! Community Initiation

Pathway To achieve the status of In-Training a coach must complete: Lets Ride! Community initiation To achieve the status of Trained a coach must complete: Lets Ride! Community initiation Basic Cycling Skills Community Cycling Initiation Step 1: Setting the Scene Step 2: Participants and their Cycling Needs Step 3: Ethical Coaching Step 4: Competition, Rules, Nutrition Step 5: Practice Planning and Cycling Safety Step 6: Practice Coaching Session Step 7: Equipment, Basic Cycling Position Step 8: Practice Coaching Session 2 Lets Ride & BCS Day 1: 9 am to 5 pm Step 1: Setting the Scene (45 min) Step 2: Participants and their Cycling Needs (45 min) Step 5: Practice Planning & Cycling Safety (45 min) Step 6a: Skills Development (25 min)

Lunch Step 6b: Practice Coaching Session (3 hrs) Day 2: 9 am to 2 pm Please bring a lunch Step 7: Equipment & Basic Cycling Position (45 min) Step 8: Practice Coaching Session 2 (2 hrs) Step 4: Competition, Rules, Nutrition (45 min) Step 3: Ethical Coaching & Wrap-up (1 hr) Step 1: Setting the Scene Step 2: Participants & their Cycling Needs HUMILITY RESPECT LEADERSHIP Person FAIR PLAY INTEGRITY ATHLETE ETHICS hwenger04

Step 3: Ethical Coaching Analysis And Decision -Making Process For Situations That Have Moral Implications 1- Establish the facts in the situation Analysis 2- Based on the facts, determine what is at stake 3- Consider options for action or decision, and the consequences of each DecisionMaking 4- Assess the pros and cons of each option 5- Select the best option for decision 6- Implement the decision and manage

the consequences Implementation Analysis And Decision-Making Process For Situations That Have Moral Implications 1- Establish the facts in the situation - Is this a situation that has legal implications? - If the situation is not legal, what ethical issues might be involved? 2- From the facts, determine what is at stake Have all 3- Consider potential options for action or decision, and the consequences of each the facts been identified? Analysis

4- Assess the pros and cons of each option Decision -Making How does each option promote a fair decision in relation to the: - outcomes or results - - means used to achieve results 5- Select the best option for decision - - Implementation What is the best course of action to follow? Who should be involved? 6- Implement thedecision and manage the

consequences Have I thought about factors that might influence me? What values must be preserved in the situation? Is this a just and reasonable decision? NCCP Code of Ethics Step 4: Competition, Rules, Nutrition Nutrition I - PRE-RIDE II - DURING RIDE III - FIRST 30 mins AFTER MORE THAN 4 HRS BEFORE Normal meal at meal time eg lean meat/fish, vegetables, fruit IV - POST RIDE

1 HOUR OR LESS: NO FOOD OR DRINK EAT/ DRINK resume normal diet pattern after first 30 minutes post-ride EAT/ DRINK RIDE 2 HOURS OR LESS: 1 700 ml bottle sport drink per ride hour 3 HOURS BEFORE 600-900 calories high carbohydrate (75%) with some protein 2 HOURS BEFORE (if you didnt eat 3 hrs before) 200-300 calories high carb, some protein

START feeding by 30 minutes 600- 1000 ml water or sport drink EAT/ DRINK EAT/ DRINK EAT/ DRINK EAT/ DRINK START feeding by 30 mins. 600-1000 ml per hr sport drink OR 1 gel plus 600-1000 water per hr EAT/ DRINK RIDE OVER 1 HOUR: Follow post-race recovery diet for

as many hours as you rode. RIDE MORE THAN 2 HRS: 1 bottle recovery drink* as soon as possible (10 mins) PLUS 1 HOUR BEFORE Water only- 500 ml over the last 50 minutes If event lasts longer than 1 hour, 10 mins BEFORE: 1 gel + 250 ml water START feeding by 30 mins. 600-1000 ml per hour sport drink OR 1 gel plus 600-1000 ml water per hour EAT/ DRINK * Recovery drink is a special mix or liquid available from many sport drink manufacturers. It includes carbohydrates along with some protein and minerals. TOTAL 3-5 bottles

OPTION diluted coke or gel with caffeine in last 30 mins. 1 more bottle recovery drink for every additional hour (eg 4 hr ride= 2 bottles) EAT/ DRINK CYCLING DIET PLAN - See Canadas Food Guide for daily regular diet examples After 30-45 minutes post-ride but before the next regular meal: include raisins, small amount of additional salt, and fresh fruit or pure fruit-based drinks (avoid sweetened fruit drinks) At first regular meal after ride: add boiled/baked potatoes or sweet potatoes to regular meal (lean meat, low fat, vegetables) Continue rehydration: recover to pre-race body weight After post-ride recovery period, resume normal diet Step 5: Practice Planning & Cycling Safety Practice Planning

Choosing and Designing Activities for your Practice General Considerations: The goal you have in mind The choice of activities The way each activity will be run The participants you coach The sport and its demands Who are my athletes? What are the logistics of my practice? Facilities available Equipment needed/available Length of the practice (time available) Time of day of the practice Number of practices per week

Availability of assistant coaches, and their experience Motor abilities Physical abilities Technical abilities/skills Decision-making abilities Mental abilities

What are the safety risks, and how should I prepare for them? My Practice Plan What do athletes have to train in my sport? Number of athletes in attendance Age/maturity of athletes Skills and abilities of athletes Gaps in ability level among athletes Injuries to account for Reasons why athletes are involved The nature of the activities the athletes will do

and the conditions in which they will take place Weather Playing surface/facilities Equipment Human error Emergency procedures to follow in case of an accident What am I trying to accomplish with my practice? How am I going to deliver my practice? Key points to make Teaching methods I will use Where I will position myself

What I will be watching for How and when I will make coaching interventions How will I organize my practice? Structure of practice Activities chosen Order of the activities Transition between activities to avoid wasting time What athletes need to improve

Purpose of the practice Team goals and shortterm objectives Goals of coaching staff Time of the season Links with previous practices and competitions Links with future practices and competitions Sport Discipline Relationships Step 6: Practice Coaching Session 1 Link Between Planning And Teaching What are the logistics of my practice? Who are my athletes? Facilities available Equipment needed/available Length of the practice (time available) Time of day of the practice Number of practices per week Availability of assistant

coaches, and their experience Number of athletes in attendance Age/maturity of athletes Skills and abilities of athletes Gaps in ability level among athletes Injuries to account for Reasons why they are involved Motor skills Physical skills Decision-making skills Mental skills My practice

How can I create a good learning environment? What teaching strategies and methods should I use? How will I explain and demonstrate? Where will I stand when the athletes are practicing? What must I be looking for when the athletes are practicing? When and how must I intervene? How often? The nature of the activities the athletes will do and the conditions in which they will take place Weather Playing surface/facilities

Equipment Human error Emergency procedures to follow in case of an accident What am I trying to accomplish with my practice? How will my session be delivered? What are the demands of my sport? What are the safety risks, and how should I prepare for them?

How am I going to organize my session? Structure of the session Choice of activities Sequence of activities Transition between activities to avoid wasting time What athletes need to improve Purpose of the practice Team goals and shortterm objectives Goals of coaching staff Time of the season Links with previous practices and competitions

Links with future practices and competitions Dimensions of Learning Affective (attitudes, behaviour) Cognitive (knowledge, understanding) Dimensions of Learning Motor (technical skills, execution) Basic Cycling Skills Skill Acquisition What is a skill? The ability to perform a movement or chain of movements with high consistency, high precision, and high efficiency The Challenge Zone Or matching the difficulty of the activity with the skill level of the participant High

ANXIETY REQUIREMENTS OF THE ACTIVITY BOREDOM Low Low High PARTICIPANT PROFICIENCY LEVEL ATTENTION BALANCE CONTROL Simple Riding & Coasting PEDAL BRAKE GEAR Looking Straight-line Riding

Sitting Front Rear Identifying Balanced Position Soft Rear Front Reacting Weight Transfer F, R, Side Standing Combined Ready Position Punch Modulate Weighting & Unweighting

Ratchet Slippery The ABCs: Basic Body Movements TURN & CORNER Medium Fast Slow Tight Narrow-platform Riding Track Stand P.A.S.S. SKILLS - BUILT FROM ABCs POWER P.A.S.S.: CLIMB ACCELERATE DESCEND

DROP LIFT Sitting Sitting Sitting Rolling Front Standing Huck Standing Crouching Integrated Skills AGILITY Standing SPATIAL SENSE MOUNT & DISMOUNT

GROUP TRAFFIC Follow Laws Draft Signal Pass Shoulder check Straddle on Standing start 2 Wheel Straddle off Rear MOVE Cowboy on Gate start

Dolphin Limbo Pack Bails Sprinting Pickup & Drop (one hand) No hands Manual Position Bump Carry Side Anticipate Buzz Safe Fall Wheelie A CYCLING SKILLS MODEL Echelon

3- or 5-Phase Skill? Skills can be analyzed as: 5 Phase: Set-up Preliminary movements Force-producing movements Critical instant Follow-through Example? 3- or 5-Phase Skill? OR, 3 Phase: Set-up Movement Follow-through Example? 3- or 5-Phase Skill? OR, 3 Phase: Set-up Movement

Follow-through Example? Skill analysis task: Choose a cycling skill What is the purpose of the skill? Break the skill down into parts Is it 3- or 5-phase? Step 7: Equipment and Basic Cycling Position Step 8: Practice Coaching Session 2 Basic Cycling Skills: Error Detection & Correction Observation Strategy: If you wanted to observe this skill being done by a beginner, what would the best vantage point be? Where to stand? What to look at? What to watch for? Fill in Observation Strategy box

Outcome Outcome/ /Form Formof ofsport sporttask task The Theoutcome outcomeserves servesto todescribe describewhen whenthe theskill skillofoftactic tacticisisclearly clearlyachieved achievedor ornot not achieved achieved Key KeyPerformance PerformanceFactors Factors How Howisisthe theoutcome

outcomeachieved? achieved? Detectable DetectableSigns Signs What Whatisisobserved? observed? How Howisisititobserved? observed? 1. Preliminary movements (i.e. Grip / Stance) 2. Back swing or recovery movement (i.e. positioning, back swing, recovery) 3. Force producing movement (i.e. Use or sequence of muscle group and joint action) 4. Critical instant (i.e. impact, strike, ) 5. Follow through. Detectable DetectableSigns Signs What Whatis

isobserved? observed? How Howis isititobserved? observed? Participant does not engage in task Participant engages in the task but the outcome is not achieved Inconsistencies or inefficiency in movement or task - Little precision or low probability of success in the task Participant engages in the task and achieves the outcome or demonstrates form What key factors come into play? Consistent and efficient movements demonstrated in task High degree of precision and

probability of success in the task Analyze Analyzepotential potentialcauses causes CAUSE GAP CAUSE GAP A. Equipment Issue FIT / TUNING 2. Environment B. Environmental factor Weather / lighting 3. Affective C. Fear or Hesitation D. Not motivated or not interested E. Lack understanding or player confused Repeat task/activity Adjust progression Adjust speed or timing or intensity

Adjust work to rest ratios, and / or Intensity (Workload) G. Lack Concentration or poor arousal control Help or reassure H. Difficulty reading / recognizing cues 5. Physical / Motor Adjust task demands F Too much information or information overload J. Task too Demanding or too easy I. Lacks physical ability to complete task 6. Tactical K. Unable to select appropriate tactic L. Choice of Decision 7. Technical M. Unable to effectively or consistently execute technique

Teaching Interventions 4. Cognitive / Mental Makes sport specific adjustments to equipment Modify / Adjust Drill or Activity 1.Equipment Select SelectAppropriate Appropriate Corrective CorrectiveMeasure Measure Explains or Ask Questions Simplify - Use examples or reduce variables to process Use re-focusing or visualization strategies Demonstrate correct technique / tactic Provide feedback or results THE TEACHING PROCESS

Organization Can someone else do the demonstration better than me ? Includes safety measures, and how the activity starts and finishes Requires at least 50% motor involvement Coach is able to supervise Explanation/Demonstration Describe the aim of the exercise Outline what is to be done and how Describe points of reference/cues Identify criteria of successful performance Touch the different communication channels (visual, kinesthetic, auditory) Supervision Ensure that the athletes are actively engaged and achieve a good rate of

success To observe, move around without interfering with athletes Supervise both individuals and the group Verify if success criteria are achieved Did I give enough time for the athletes to practice before stopping them to give feedback? Feedback Identify the cause of failure Adapt the activity as needed Help athletes by reassuring them Explain and demonstrate again if necessary Recognize successful performance Effects of the feedback Give the athletes time to practice

again to check whether they have acted on the feedback Did I remember to ask the athletes to give me feedback before giving them mine? Key Factors To Consider In Assessing Teaching Effectiveness Safety Organisation Promotes maximum practice time Reflects sport-specific procedures that are proven Equipment is available and ready to be used Enables a rapid transition between

explanations and activities, and between activities Optimal use of space, time, and equipment Coach freed up to supervise activities better Promotes individual attention to athletes Type of practice and conditions in which activities take place during practice Weather Site and practice area Equipment Level of fatigue of the athletes Behaviour of the athletes Done in conditions

similar to those the athletes will face All the athletes can see and hear Sufficient number (2-3) of reference points identified Safety factors identified Include some criteria to enable athletes to evaluate their own performance as they practice Athletes learning Quantity and quality of motor involvement Learning styles

Explanations and demonstrations Observation and supervision of activities Feedback Learning environment Athletes are actively engaged most of the time Opportunities exist to interact with athletes who need the most attention Degree of difficulty of exercises is adapted to the skills level of the athletes Signs of boredom are recognized and the task is adapted as needed

Active supervision (moving around to observe all the athletes) Constant scanning of practices Observing performance from different vantage points Comparing observed performance to relevant success criteria Interventions are done individually (mostly) and to the group (as needed) Is specific (accurately outlines what to correct and how) Is positive and constructive to promote selfesteem Non-verbal feedback is coherent with verbal

feedback Is correct from a technical point of view Is coherent with success criteria identified for the task Is formulated clearly and in a manner that draws the attention of the athlete on the right things Is provided at the right time and frequency For more coaching information www.cyclingcanada.ca www.coach.ca

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