Game On (Div. C) Dan Nichols National Event

Game On (Div. C) Dan Nichols National Event Supervisor [email protected] Presentation Parts Part 1 Rules overview/New game requirement Part 2 Student preparation Part 3 Supervisor recommendations

Part 4 Sample games Part 1 Rules overview Description This event will determine a teams ability to design and build an original computer game incorporating the theme and game type

provided to them by the supervisor using the program Scratch. EVENT PARAMETERS: Students Teams must bring: Writing Utensils Teams may bring: Headset(s) to assist in testing audio A microphone to assist in recording original audio

EVENT PARAMETERS: Students Students prohibited activities: No internet access outside of the Scratch program is allowed No other computer programs can be utilized No external resources of any kind are allowed No pre-constructed games, game assets or files of any kind are allowed

EVENT PARAMETERS: Supervisors Supervisors must provide: A computer capable of running Scratch (Tournament directors are encouraged to provide computer specifications to the teams as early as possible) A broad theme and the type of game to build their original computer game around Scrap paper

THE COMPETITION: The supervisor must assign the teams a broad theme and the type of game that the original computer game will be built around. The theme and the type of game must be the same for all teams and allow students to build games involving some scientific principles associated with the theme.

SAMPLE GAME THEMES: Some possible game themes: Fire Gravity Silly sports Frogs Waves Light

THE COMPETITION: The Supervisor will choose from the following game types for the students to build their game Invitational and regional game types: (a) Collection, (b) Maze, (c) Avoidance State game types: (a) Any invitational and regional game

type, (b)Shooting (c), Racing, (d) Building National Game types: (a) Any combination of 2 regional or state game types, (b) a two-player game of any previous single game type THE COMPETITION:

Invitational and regional game types: Collection the user controlled sprite is involved in the collecting of objects to complete the objective of the game. Maze the user controlled sprite must navigate through a series of static obstacles, borders, boundaries or lines to complete the objective of the game Avoidance the user controlled sprite must avoid moving autonomous sprites to complete the

objective of the game THE COMPETITION: State game types: Any Invitational and regional game types Shooting the user controlled sprite must shoot or direct an object(s) during the game to complete the objective of the game

Racing the user controlled sprite must complete the objectives of the game before the autonomous sprite does Building the user controlled sprite must be involved in the assembling of smaller parts or components to complete the objectives in the game THE COMPETITION:

National Game types: Combination of any two of the previous game types Two player game of any one of the previous game types THE COMPETITION:

Students will use the Scratch program (Available on-line and for download from http://scratch.mit.edu) to create an original computer game based on the assigned theme and the type of game . THE COMPETITION: When teams are finished, they must save their

game following the supervisors instructions in the specified format in a designated location. (ie: USB drive, desktop, online repository) SCORING: Scoring of the event will be done using the scoring rubric (found on www.soinc.org). Zero points will be awarded for items not

being present in the game or inappropriate content. Points will be awarded based on the coding and/or game play of the items. SCORING: Any team caught using outside resources,

accessing other computer programs or the internet outside of the scratch program will be asked to leave the room and be disqualified from the event. (This includes logging into a students Scratch account) Any team not addressing the assigned theme and the type of game in their game will be ranked behind those who do, because not addressing the theme and the type of game is a violation of the spirit of the competition.

SCORING: Ties will be broken by comparing the point totals in the scoring areas in the following order: 1st Tie breaker Total points for Game Mechanics, 2nd Game play, 3rd User control, 4th Balanced Play, 5th- Overall Game

SCORING RUBRIC: The scoring rubric is broken down into two major categories: Game Mechanics and Game Play Game Mechanics is the portion of the scoring that deals with the coding and development of the game Game Play is the functioning of the game during game play

Each of the these categories is worth 50 points. SCORING RUBRIC: Game Mech Introduction (4 Points)

Game title is present Buttons/keys used to access other screens/options SCORING RUBRIC: Game Mech Help/instructions (6 Points) game objective stated movement controls explained

scoring explained SCORING RUBRIC: Game Mech User controlled (UC) sprite (6 Points) movement complexity (4 pts) sprite orientation

SCORING RUBRIC: Game Mech Autonomous sprites (6 Points) movement complexity (4 pts) sprite orientation SCORING RUBRIC: Game Mech

Collision management (6 Points) sprite interactions (4 pts) environment interactions SCORING RUBRIC: Game Mech

Scorekeeping (4 Points) functions properly in game scoring appears on screen SCORING RUBRIC: Game Mech De-briefing (8 Points) clear outcome for the game

game play stops items remaining on screen are appropriate end of game options available SCORING RUBRIC: Game Mech Documentation (4 Points) coding comments included

main sections of coding explained SCORING RUBRIC: Game Mech Code organization (6 Points) elements are named/titled elements are logically grouped and organized coding is efficient

SCORING RUBRIC: Game Play Science of theme (12 Points) level of scientific thought applied to theme (4 pts) appropriate principles applied to theme (4 pts) scientific explanation included in game (4 pts)

SCORING RUBRIC: Game Play Graphics (12 Points) (4 pts) quality/complexity of UC sprite (4 pts) quality/complexity of Autonomous sprites (4 pts) quality/complexity of backgrounds SCORING RUBRIC: Game

Play Sound (6 Points) sounds are appropriate quality/complexity of sounds (4 pts) SCORING RUBRIC: Game Play

Play balance (12 Points) level of difficulty (4 pts) speeds are appropriate for the game (4 pts) movements in the game are appropriate(4 pts) SCORING RUBRIC: Game Play

Overall game (8 Points) overall impression of the game (4 pts) originality of the game (4 pts) Part 2 Student Preparation Coaching tips Practice, Practice, Practice Make sure students can build games without logging in to their Scratch account.

There are subtle differences between the two. Make sure students are proficient at building the different game types for each level of competition Make sure they practice coding more advanced movements Coaching tips

Spend time playing other peoples games and examining the coding in the games to see how they coded it. Get feedback from students, coaches parents on your games. Do some scientific research on potential science topics and what game ideas you can come up with.

Coaching tips: Competition Have students work together Decide in the first few minutes how they will incorporate the theme into the game type In first five minutes game idea should be set and construction should have begun Keep track of your time Save early and often Notify the supervisor immediately if a

computer problem arises dont try to fix it Have fun Part 3 Supervisor Recommendations Event Set-up: Logistics

As with any event this is very site dependent Needs: Supervisor for game creation room Recommended to have 1 or 2 other monitors to help monitor students and make sure they are on the correct site and to also help troubleshoot any issues Have each monitor with a stopwatch to time if there are issues to provide students with the correct time lost

Graders Recommended to have 3 graders if possible and average the score to get the winning team Time permitting, have each grader score every game If time is limited, have the graders break the rubric into parts with the same person grading the same part Event Set-up: Logistics Volunteers if you have volunteers they make excellent monitors to help supervisor

Computers PC or Mac (Scratch looks and functions the same on both) Will run on desktop or laptop Can be run on-line or offline. Recommended to have a site IT person available for problems Numbers- ideally you have twice as many machines as you have teams per time block That allows for a faster turn around between sessions

Event Set-up: Logistics Explain to the students how the event is run and how to name their game and save the games Try to put any vitally important materials in writing on the board for teams to see (ie how to save game where to save game how to name game, etc) If possible, display a countdown timer for

the students so they can see how much time is remaining Event Set-up: Logistics Saving game - have a specified way of naming the saved game (ie: team number then part of school name C77Allstaracademy) Save location vitally important to explain

to teams where to save the game. Event Set-up: Logistics Saving game - ways to save Desktop Flashdrive On-line repository

Network drive folder Any other site specific way that fits your needs Event Grading: Graders: have a separate quiet grading room laptops work great for graders. Each grader needs ear buds since most games

will have sound and can be very distracting Grading approach Many different approaches to grading. This is the sequence that the graders from this years National tournament agreed would work. Approximately 10 minutes should be utilized to grade the game

Event Grading: Start off by playing the game a few times (for first 1 to 2 minutes max Grade the coding section next as you examine the code, apply what happened in the game to the code and score with the rubric (replay game as needed) Grade the game play section next replay the game trying to win, then trying to lose,

then again as needed . Event Grading: Some discussion on how/when to assign points for Overall game play Can be done as you grade the game Can be done by returning to the game at the end

of the day and assigning points after all games have been seen. Can be done as you finish each sections games Part 4 Sample Games Internet Resources https://scratch.mit.edu/ https://scratch.mit.edu/help/

More resources will be forthcoming on the National Science Olympiad Site www.soinc.org

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