Level System Standard English Levels of Essay Writing

Level System Standard English Levels of Essay Writing in 12Std2 Level 6 Same as level 5 but with integrated contextual information about the composer. Level 5 - Same as level 4 but with 3-5 body paragraphs, significant use of comparative language and significant use of critical language Level 4 Level 3 -Possibly paragraphs organised by idea rather than poem (not mandatory) - Structured introduction and conclusion - Same as level 3 but with 3-4 body paragraphs and some comparative language - Some form of Introduction and conclusion - 2 body paragraphs that follow the PETAAAAAL structure with multiple techniques (at least 3) in each paragraph and at least 2 quotes per paragraph) - Some critical language used making comments on the purpose and or effectiveness of the text. Level 2

- Some form of Introduction/ body/ conclusion - Body consists of some PETAL paragraphs (2-3) that mention ideas in the text with some evidence from the text (technique/quote per paragraph) Level 1 - Some form of Introduction/ body/ conclusion - Body consists of some form of paragraphs (1-2) that mention some of the ideas in the text Levels System 12Std2 Note: Levels are not equated with bands. Just because you are at a level 2 does not mean you are at a band 2, likewise level 6 does not mean band 6. It is just a simple way to look at the different places our writing is at and how to improve it Do not try to jump levels. We can not fix everything at once. Pick one aspect to improve upon and work on that. If you want to improve faster do more drafts If you are limited by speed of handwriting it will be challenging to push beyond a level 4 however when you have successfully attained a level 4 you can look at putting in some of the language from the higher levels. How to Level 1 Some form of Introduction/ body/ conclusion - Body consists of some form of paragraphs (1-2) that mention some of the ideas in the text

TO LEVEL UP TO 2. Use a PETAL scaffold to structure your paragraphs in terms of your ideas Level 2 - Some form of Introduction/ body/ conclusion - Body consists of some PETAL paragraphs (2-3) that mention ideas in the text with some evidence from the text (technique/quote per paragraph) TO LEVEL UP TO 3. - Use the PETAAAAAL scaffold to put more depth in your paragraphs. Remember you will need multiple techniques (3+) and 2-3 quotes to make your point - Use the critical language glossary and try to use some of these words effectively in your essay Level 3 - Some form of Introduction and conclusion - 2 body paragraphs that follow the PETAAAAAL structure with multiple techniques (at least 3) in each paragraph and at least 2 quotes per paragraph) - Some critical language used making comments on the purpose and or effectiveness of the text. TO LEVEL UP TO 4.

- Use the introduction and conclusion scaffolds to add more structure - Create a Venn diagram to compare the texts you are writing about - Use the comparative language glossary and make some comparisons between the texts in your essay - Write plenty of timed drafts to allow you to produce 3-4 paragraphs in 40 minutes Level 4 - Structured introduction and conclusion - Same as level 3 but with 3-4 body paragraphs and some comparative language TO LEVEL UP TO 5. - Use the comparative language and critical language glossaries and try to incorporate more consistently throughout the entire essay - Possibly paragraphs organised by idea rather than poem (not mandatory but recommended) - Practice writing full essays within 40minute timeframes without notes to allow you to reproduce your prepared essay under exam conditions - Practice adapting your essay to different essay questions using past papers and language from the rubic to form questions for yourself Level 5 - Same as level 4 but with 3-5 body paragraphs, significant use of comparative language and significant use of critical language -Possibly paragraphs organised by idea rather than poem (not mandatory) TO LEVEL UP TO 6. Use contextual information scaffold and try to integrate information about the composer that has

an impact on the intended meaning of the text Scaffolds needed PETAL scaffold PETAAAAAL scaffold critical language glossary Introduction and conclusion scaffold Venn Diagram comparative language glossary the rubric contextual information scaffold PETAL Scaffold P= make a point that answers the question E= give some evidence (a quotation) to back up your point T = name the technique used by

the writer in the quote A= analyse the technique explaining how it helps demonstrate the point L= link all your ideas back to the initial point you made Point/Thesis (main idea of your paragraph) Example (quote) Technique Analysis Effect of the technique Analysis - Impact on relationships (between characters and between character and audience) Analysis meaning and theme Analysis Link to concept Analysis Why this matters

Link back to your main thesis idea Critical language glossary and other effective words and phrases notes: - try to use strong modality throughout your essay to actively convince the marker of your ideas - consider quantifying the impact made for example, subtle or powerful - not all words and phrases will work with all topics or ideas evoke ramifications this notion. actively reinforces hindering the connection provocative conflicting moral and cultural impact intrusive redundant rendering effectively captures strengthening the connection between inhumane ironically juxtaposes altering the perspective of is exposed to greatly Impacting on begin to alter the emotional dichotomy epitomises powerful insight into ultimately indicating disseminating

propagating detached paradoxical scrutinises instinctive professing transcending authorial intrusion maturation profound shiftin exemplifies metaphysical fragmented directly/indirectly characterising intuitive manifestation the formation of foreboding retrospectively injustices inflicted upon effusing mastery impoverished despondent directly observing the stoic simultaneously depicts unique and compelling dehumanising anonymity of multimodal

shockingly exposes terrifying vulnerability facilitate compelling manifestatio ns atrocities sympathetically representing authentic depiction foreshadowing elements of debilitating venturing forth into immeasurably irrefutably renewed positivity actively portraying the intolerances of evoking transformative perceptions immutable consequences paradigm shiftin chilling imagery completely fracturing undertones of hostility Introduction Structure : Essay thesis statement that sets up your perspective on the question and outline your argument for your essay Statement about the concept and its importance(Note this could be more contextual for Close study of text

Identify texts, composers and text type (the medium). Brief overview (one sentence each) about how specific themes/issues to be focused on in each text. Last sentence affi rm composers perspective on human experience and the importance of the collection Conclusion Structure: Reaffi rm essay thesis Reaffi rm understanding of the concept (and/or context for close study) Explain the importance of this collection of poems and why it is important/unique HOW have the texts created a detailed and multifaceted view to get their AUDIENCE to RESPOND Brief overview (one sentence each) about how specific themes/issues to be focused on in each text. Last sentence affi rm the thesis concept of different composers experience and the themes they communicate to inform or educate their audience Unique Features and Ideas Text 1

Similar Features and Ideas Text 1 and 2 Unique Features and Ideas Text 2 Unique Features and Ideas Text 1 Similar Features and Ideas Text 1 and 2 Unique Features and Ideas Text 2 Similar Features and Ideas All texts Similar Features and Ideas Text 1 and 3 Unique Features and Ideas Text 3 Similar Features and Ideas Text 2 and 3 What are comparative statements? Chances are you have not had to speak about more than one text in an English essay in

junior school, however, as a senior student you will be expected to talk about two or more texts in a single essay in Year 10 forward. When we select texts to support our thesis (a main idea that an essay sets out to discuss or look at in depth) we need to show how the different texts we pick fit together like a jig saw puzzle to show a detailed picture about what we want to discuss (for example in this case why did the representation of World War 1 change from eager anticipation of adventure in the romantic era to the destructive disillusionment in the later realistic phase in various poems, posters and novels). A comparative stateme nt is not an analysis (techniques or quotes), instead it states a theme about how the events, ideas or values of the author are similar or different when we put two text side by side. How do I use a comparative statement? Comparative statements are like the links in a chain that connect the ideas between out different texts together to prove our essays main point. Sequence and effect words terms we use to introduce or connect sentences in a T.E.E.A.L. paragraph. Furthermore

In addition Exemplified As a consequence Accordingly Comparison similar or common themes Simultaneously Similarly Complements Echoes Connection Identically SIMILAR MESSAGES, IDEAS, VALUES Contrast- different or conflicting themes

Alternatively Differences Disconnection Although Despite Nevertheless Whereas Unlike However On the contrary Indecently Juxtaposition (to put two things side by side to point out how they are similar but finally different in their structure, meaning or ideas)

This highlights This represents The duality It correlates As a result Particularly In essence SIMILAR MESSAGES, IDEAS, VALUES Comparative language glossary Phrases:

By comparison... By contrast On the other hand Linked to this concept A comparable use of..........can be seen in............. Associated with this idea is.... A parallel can be drawn with... A similar technique/ idea is used in... An extension of this idea can be seen in... A development of this idea can be seen in... A simplification of this idea can be seen in... Similarly... An aspect of this idea is developed in... An element of this is captured in... CONTRAST Another way of portraying this is shown in... A comparable text is... Alternatively Although COMPARE This contrasts to In both cases They are distinguishable in that Similarly As well as In the same way Likewise

The most significant Yet Differs from Compared to Different from Not only... but also... While in contrast The greatest effect The most serious of which More effective than They are comparable in that In comparison, this text is relatively In comparison Elsewhere Nevertheless Whilst Dissimilar to Shows a distinction between Notwithstanding Module B: Close Study of Text This module requires students to engage in detailed analysis of a text. It develops students understanding of how the ideas, forms and language of a text interact within the text and may affect those responding to it. Each elective in this module involves close study of a single text from a list of prescribed texts. Students engage with the text to respond imaginatively, affectively and critically. They explore and analyse particular char acteristics of the text, considering how these shape meaning. They also consider the ways in which these characteristics establish the texts distinctive qualities. Composition focuses on meaning shaped in and through the text. These compositions may be re alised in a variety of forms and media.

The Close Study of Text module means a close study of how themes, issues, ideas, contexts, concepts and values are presented through the distinctive features of the text including content, structure and language features of the text. Summary of key ideas: Owens general purpose for writing war poems was to: Expose the truth of war: the shame, the humiliation, the pity and the carnage experienced by the soldiers who fought and families who suffered their loss. Challenge the notions of glory and excitement promoted by the politicians of war. Emphasise the enormity of the sacrifice and tragedy suffered by young soldiers who experienced war first hand. Romantic: Pre -war perceptions and atti tudes. Romanticized (Def); Means an unreal expectation or exaggeration about something. 1. Heroism 2. Nobility (Def): A state or (Def): Heroic conduct or courageous duty under extraordinary circumstances.

5. Patriotism (Def): A love and loyalty to ones own country. Romantic 4. Honour (Def): The dignity and respect accorded to a position or an individuals reputation. quality of being morally good or dignified. 3. Sacrifice (Def): A profound to loss forfeit (one thing) for another considered to be of greater value. Summary Rubric overview Owen Bio

Why/When he enlisted Where did he fight/see Awards/ values Death/legacy Find 3 quotes by the poet on war or his experiences of war Poems/quote

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • What is remote sensing? Remote sensing is defined

    What is remote sensing? Remote sensing is defined

    Major interest for the transfer of radiant energy is the value of absorption coefficient (spectroscopy). Total energy of a molecule consists of rotation, vibration, electronic, and translation. E=Erot+Evib+Eelc+Etrans Absorption or emmision occurs when molecule changes from energy level E1 to...
  • Naming Decimals - Laurel County

    Naming Decimals - Laurel County

    One and three tenths. Example 2. 0.13. There are no whole numbers in this example so go to step two. The last digit in the decimal is 3 and it is in the hundredths place. Since there is no whole...
  • Wednesday, November 10

    Wednesday, November 10

    1/25 George Washington KWL (movie) 6. 1/26 George Washington Domestic Policy notes 7. 3. Get out a sheet of paper and title it: Chapter 9 Vocabulary quiz Learning Recovery -2nd Period. Semester Test Review - Wed. , Feb. 2. ...
  • 10 Experimental Research: One-Way Designs

    10 Experimental Research: One-Way Designs

    Times New Roman MS Pゴシック MS P明朝 Arial Times Default Design 10 Experimental Research: One-Way Designs Demonstration of Causality One-Way Experimental Design Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) Hypothesis Testing in Experimental Design Between-Groups and Within-Groups Variance Estimates Data F value ANOVA...
  • IAB/IESG Recommendatins on IPv6 Address Allocation

    IAB/IESG Recommendatins on IPv6 Address Allocation

    IAB/IESG Recommendations on IPv6 Address Allocation Bob Hinden at RIPE Sept. 2000 Brian Carpenter at ARIN Oct. 2000 Alain Durand at APNIC Oct. 2000
  • Lossy Compression of Graphs, Networks and Metric spaces

    Lossy Compression of Graphs, Networks and Metric spaces

    Suppose ? is the complete graph. ... Theorem 3. A (1+?)-approximation of minimum-cut by a 2-pass algorithm using ?(??) space . Known: one pass (streaming/incremental) using ?(??2) space. ... Networks and Metric spaces
  • Astro-Spectroscpy

    Astro-Spectroscpy

    Brightness and Temperature. Brightness is the total energy emitted, or the . luminosity. of an object. The luminosity is related to the (blackbody) temperature of the object. L = s T4 (s is a constant) Stefan-Boltzmann Law. where T is...
  • Implementing Neural Networks for Text Classification: Data Sets

    Implementing Neural Networks for Text Classification: Data Sets

    Times New Roman Arial Courier New Fireball Implementing Neural Networks for Text Classification: Data Sets Data Set Selection Advantages of Standard Data Sets Most popular corpora Reuters-21578 data set Reuters-21578 data set Example of a Reuter-21578 document 20-newsgroup data set...