Perspectives and Lenses - Ms. Overton's Class!

Perspectives and Lenses Grab an AP Capstone Lens Map and parent letter from atop the laptop cart. You should also make sure your Artifact Notebook is picked up, along with a pair of scissors and a glue stick. If you do not have your own you may borrow one of each from the cabinet behind the door. Make sure they are returned at the end of class. Take out your elevator speech notes from last class. We will finish the elevator speeches and then start with todays lesson.

Elevator Speeches part II You will be given a time limit of 1 minute. Remember: Your goal is to sell yourself to your peers, so that they have an understanding of how you will work within a group. Treat this as an interview! I am randomly drawing names to determine the order. During the speeches you are to remain attentive and write down the name of each speaker, along with at least one fact you learned about that person. Students presenting should allow a classmate to use their personal device to record their speech. You should always be prepared to speak!!! This is never a good position to place yourself!

Label Entry #3: Lenses and Perspectives (Make sure to update your table of contents with the appropriate pg. #s in your book.) ~ Cut down the lens map and glue it in on this page. ~ Take any notes you feel are important here too! I encourage you to ask questions if you would like further clarity. At this point in the course, I don't know what you don't know unless you let me know that you don't know it. Homework: Cafeteria Picture - Share your picture with your neighbor. - Discuss the similarities and differences. What

accounts for them, and which ones stand out the most? - How do your photos show different perspectives? Kylie McGlade Josh Dinno Eva Mayer Addilyn Schlegel Cafeteria Perspectives Mikayla Hudson

Constant Barthes Emma Larson Perspectives Whenever a photograph is taken, the camera will be aimed from a particular vantage point. The way you hold the camera, as well as how it is pointed at your subject, can drastically change the perspective of the photograph. For Seminar purposes, a perspective is simply a viewpoint, or a relative direction from which something is viewed. Perspectives can be a result of physical factors, such as a camera angle, or observational, such as this person's point of view rather than that

person's. Perspectives can also be abstract, such as a certain demographic group (Duke vs. Tarheel fans) or a philosophical school of thought (Deists vs. Monotheists vs. Atheist vs. Polytheist) Lenses From College Board: Examining topics from different points of view and making connections across disciplines are fundamental components of AP seminar. Analyzing topics through multiple lenses aids in interdisciplinary understanding and helps students gain a rich

appreciation for the complexity of important issues. Lenses With your partner, discuss for each lens: - AP Seminar lenses: 1. Cultural and social 2. Artistic and philosophical 3. Political and historical 4. Environmental

5. Economic 6. Scientific 7. Futuristic 8. Ethical - Why do you think College Board included this lens? How does it fit into the course, curriculum and overall goals? Pick any other lense, and for your previous topic, discuss how your lens might complement or conflict with

another lens. Briefly share thoughts: AP Seminar lenses: 1. Cultural and social 2. Artistic and philosophical 3. Political and historical 4. Environmental 5. Economic 6. Scientific 7. Futuristic 8. Ethical

Groups of 4 Using the political cartoons from our first journal entry, discuss the content and overall message of the political cartoon THROUGH YOUR LENSE. Be Camera: brain/mind Direction of pointing: perspective (point of view) Adding a lens: allows you to see Introduction

Watch the following clips together: - - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PcKzIDc 1V-s (quick clip) https ://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mUYZ2c5OHI c (quick clip)

Activity Part 1 10 Minutes: - You will be split into groups and assigned a lense, and will need a sheet of poster paper. - For your lense, brainstorm as many perspectives as possible about the events depicted in any of these clips or readings. Write them on your poster paper. Activity Part 2

- You will now rotate to other groups posters. If they have the same perspective as one from your poster, draw a thin line through it. - If you can think of any additional perspectives through their lense, add them on their poster paper in a different color. - When you return to your own poster, note the perspectives that

were crossed out, those that remained, and those that were added. Activity Part 3 Discuss with your group for 10 minutes: - Which perspectives were most common amongst all the lenses? If a perspective comes up under multiple lenses, what does that mean? Does it necessarily mean its a bad perspective? -

Which perspectives were most specific to your lense (i.e. not crossed out)? How do you interpret this? - What perspectives were added to your original poster? Homework (in google classroom) Click HERE and read the information on perspectives related to the space race. Pick a Capstone Seminar lens through which to interpret the information. Explain your interpretation in a well written paragraph. Additionally, in another well written paragraph, evaluate the credibility of this source. Watch this movie trailer for Hidden Figures. Research a credible

source of information related to the real Hidden Figures. Write a brief paragraph analysis of their perspective. Cite your source. (Click HERE for citation information from Purdue Owl). Then, in a separate paragraph, explain why your source of information is reliable. That's 4 paragraphs due by next class. If you don't have it done, then you're going to be behind and it will be obvious. Remember, Capstone is only beginning...If you need to search, do so now....

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