Opinion Writing In Primary: Exercise and the Brain

Should We Have Zoos? Inspired by Should There Be Zoos? By Tony Stead Developed by Jean Wolph, Louisville Writing Project Based on National Writing Project CRWP principles Mini-Unit Overview Writing Argument MINI-UNIT Emphasis ARGUMENT SKILLS PRODUCT ELEMENTS OF ARGUMENT Reading CLOSE READING STRATEGIES RESPONSE TO READINGS Close reading strategies

Writing & talking to develop knowledge on topic or issue TOPICS # of Lessons Draft, Feedback, Revise, Reflect Introducing a Entering Skills: research Sharing ideas in based a whole class opinion discussion Partner reading 6 Lessons Foundational Skills: Identifying evidence used to support opinions Writing an

introduction Extending Skills: Remodeling claims to focus on a specific angle. Product: Opinion piece Researching to make an informed opinion Making a claim Cataloguing potential evidence (pro or con) Studying a text to see how writers support an opinion Distinguishing

evidence (pro or con) Studying models to learn how to introduce opinions Scaffolded claim writing: We should (should not) have zoos because _____. Scaffolded drafting Should We Have Zoos? 4 shared readings (students models of opinion pieces on zoos)

PQP Feedback on focus area: introduction 2 Writing Standards Emphasized in the Mini-Unit Grade 2: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.2.8 Describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.2.1 Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking words (e.g.,because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement or section. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.2.7 Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations).

Writing Standards Emphasized in the Mini-Unit Grade 3: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.1.A Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.1.B Provide reasons that support the opinion. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.1.C Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, therefore, since, for example) to connect opinion and reasons. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.1.D Provide a concluding statement or section. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.7 Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.3.9 Compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic. Mini-Unit Instructional Sequence Day 1 Introduce

research question (inquiry) Gather our knowledge about zoos on a class chart Find out what others think by reading selections from Should There Be Zoos by Tony Stead: Study text 1; read aloud/think aloud. Dual purpose: see models of student work. Rate

effectiveness. Begin chart: Pros and Cons of Zoos Day 2 Study text 2; Partner reading and sharing. Rate effectiveness. Continue class charting of responses: Pros and Cons of Zoos (Can add informational sources each day at teachers

discretion.) Day 3 Study text 3; Partner reading and sharing. Rate effectiveness. Continue class charting of responses: Pros and Cons of Zoos (Can add informational sources each day at teachers discretion.) Day 4

Study text 4; Partner reading and sharing. Rate effectiveness. Continue class charting of responses: Pros and Cons of Zoos Making a claim

Day 5 Days 6-7 Studying ways writers introduce opinion pieces Drafting of body and conclusion. Trying several introducetions for our opinion pieces PQP Rewriting as needed

(May take 2 days) What do we know about zoos? Lets do a quick-write, then list our ideas on a class chart. What do we know about zoos? C t p a g n i ur r u o n i

h t g n i k Lets Research: Pros and Cons of Zoos PDF available at http:// mrjohnsonsfifthgradecl ass.weebly.com/ uploads/ 1/4/3/7/14373384/ should_there_be_zoos. pdf Before We Begin Reading and Discussing Arguments We will read 4 arguments from Should There Be Zoos?, written by Grade 4 students. Zoochosis Captive Breeding and Reintroduction

Entertainment Death and Disease We will discuss each article: How do reasons support specific points the authors make? Look for evidence. Today we will Jigsaw. Your table will read and study one article. What is the big point of the article? Is this a reason FOR or AGAINST zoos? What specific points do the authors make? What evidence do they use? Then you will rate the article. Did it help you understand the issue? Was the evidence factual? Did the authors convince you? 3 Points: This is a strong argument. 2 Points: This is an adequate (okay) argument. 1 Point: This is a poor argument. (It didnt convince us.) Finally, you will share with the class the big points and main reasons of the article you read, along with your rating (1, 2, 3). Charting the Presentation of Evidence As groups report, capture the big ideas and evidence. For Zoos

Against Zoos Taking a Position Which side are you on? Are you FOR zoos or AGAINST zoos? Write for 5 minutes to capture your thinking. Should We Have Zoos? We should have zoos ___________ because ____________. We should not have zoos ___________ because ____________. Challenge! A good claim doesnt give away everything you know or could say about your position. Opinion writers use umbrella words to make their claims more succinct or short and sweet. Try an umbrella word in your claim. Examples: cruel, educational, efficient, harmful, helpful. Do we need more research? [Teacher may add additional readings or videos, continuing to chart pro-con evidence.]

Finding an Audience Who needs to know what we know? Why do they need to know it? Planning an Opinion Piece Introduction: What is the issue? re He Claim: What is your opinion? ts a h s w s e r He . n o g n i

o g . k n i h t I t wha . t i k n I thi y h w s e r

e H Evidence: What reasons support your opinion? nt a w I What details help explain your thinking? s t a h w s . e U r e O H of Y Conclusion: What do you want your reader to think or do?

How do authors write an INTRODUCTION? Lets re-read each opening. What do we notice? Now try your own introduction! A good introduction catches the readers attention. A good introduction lets us know what the issue is. What do we need to know about the topic? A good introduction often includes your claim. Lets PQP our introductions! PRAISE: Did your partner do each of these things? QUESTION: Was there something you didnt understand? POLISH: Is there something your partner could add or improve? A good introduction catches the readers attention. A good introduction tells what the issue is. What do we need to know about the topic? A good introduction often includes your claim. Drafting the Body of Our Opinion Pieces y h

w s e r e H . t i k n I thi Evidence: What reasons support your opinion? What details help explain your thinking? Lets go back to our Pro/Con chart. Which ideas will help you convince readers to think as you do? Which are the best ones for your audience? Write a paragraph for each reason you select. Explain to the reader how the evidence helps prove your claim. Drafting the Ending of Our Opinion Pieces t n a

Iw s t a h w s . e U r e O H of Y Conclusion: This will be your last paragraph. What do you want your reader to think or do? Talk with a partner before you write. Think together about WHAT you want readers to do about zoos. Then WRITE it.

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