Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) Priority 6: School Climate

Priority X: A Webinar Series Dedicated to the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) State Priorities Todays Topic: Priority 6 School Climate TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Introductions Jeff Breshears, Director, Local Agency Systems Support Office Shanine Coats, Interim Division Director, Improvement and Accountability Division Tom Herman, Education Administrator, Coordinated School Health and Safety Office

Brandi Jauregui, Information Technology Specialist, Educational Data Management Division Kristen Brown, One System Whole Child Initiative Lead Jacquelyn Ollison, Education Administrator, Office of the Chief Deputy Jen Taylor, Education Programs Consultant, Expanded Learning Division Special Guest Dr. Susan Levine, Riverside County Office of Education Special Guest Spencer Lara, 12th grade student, Lakewood High School, Californians for Justice Tom Torlakson, State Superintendent of Public Instruction TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 2 Goals for Today The importance of school climate

School Climates connection to the system of support Measuring school climate (State and Local Indicators) Resources and supports for the implementation and improvement of school climate Highlights of promising school climate practices from the field TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 3 What is Priority X? Jacquelyn Ollison, Education Administrator Office of the Chief Deputy

TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Jen Taylor, Education Programs Consultant Expanded Learning Division School Conditions and Climate Work Group Scope The California Department of Education (CDE) has convened a School Climate and Conditions Work Group (CCWG) to support further policy development in the area of school climate and in relation to the broader context of school conditions. The role of the CCWG is advisory to the CDE and the State Superintendent of Public Instruction. The review of broader aspects of school climate will also inform

the assessment of performance relevant to LCFF Priorities 1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, and 10. The CDE will use the work of the CCWG to support the development of a set of recommendations regarding school conditions and climate metrics. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 5 Results of the Work Comprehensive set of recommendations for the state and local level that were split into three buckets for action Bucket 1: Focus on Legislature Bucket 2: Focus on the California School Dashboard Bucket 3: Focus on including supports for capacity-building and

implementation within the statewide system of support Priority X is a product of Bucket 3 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 6 School Conditions and Climate Work Group Definition of School Climate School Conditions and Climate refers to the character and quality of school life. This includes the values, expectations, interpersonal relationships, materials and resources, supports, physical environment, and practices that foster a welcoming, inclusive, and academically challenging environment. Positive school conditions and

climate ensure people in the school community (students, staff, family, and community) feel socially, emotionally, and physically safe, supported, connected to the school, and engaged in learning and teaching. View the School Conditions and Climate Work Group Recommendation Framework at https:// www.cde.ca.gov/be/pn/im/documents/memo-ocd-oct17item01a1.pdf. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 7 Overview of LCFF State Priorities and the Statewide System of Support

Shanine Coates Interim Division Director Improvement and Accountability Division TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Californias Accountability and Continuous Improvement System The Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) significantly changed how California provides resources to public schools and holds local educational agencies (LEAs) accountable for improving student performance. LCFF, which the Legislature and Governor passed in 2013, includes state priority areas that define a quality education more broadly than a single test score and requires that the accountability system

consider all priorities. The new accountability system is based on multiple measures that are based on factors that contribute to a quality education, including high school graduation rates, college/career readiness, student test scores, English learner (EL) progress, suspension rates, and parent engagement. Central components of Californias Accountability and Continuous Improvement System include: Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP) California School Dashboard Californias System of Support TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 9 Shifts in Californias

Approach to Improvement Education Improvement Before LCFF Education Improvement After LCFF Top-down transactional exchanges focused on schools in isolation Support providers work alongside LEAs and their schools to identify key challenges and opportunities Packaged approaches for interventions

Systemic approach tailored to locally identified needs and strengths Isolated team decision making Engaging with local educators and communities as part of decision making Redundancy and contradictions across state and federal programs Streamlined and coherent expectations for LEAs across state and federal programs

Assistance disconnected from local priorities and focus Assistance supports LEAs in aligning, prioritizing, and using resources to meet student needs identified in the LCAP TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 10 Californias System of Support The overarching goal of Californias System of Support is:

To help LEAs and their schools meet the needs of each student they serve, with a focus on building local capacity to sustain improvement and to effectively address disparities in opportunities and outcomes. The characteristics within the Statewide System of Support are: Reduce redundancy across state and federal programs Integrate guidance and resources across state and federal programs Support LEAs to meet identified student needs through the LCAP process TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 11 Levels of Support Level of

Support Description of Supports Available Support for All LEAs and Schools (Level 1) Various state and local agencies provide an array of support resources, tools, and voluntary technical assistance that all LEAs may use to improve student performance at the LEA and school level and narrow disparities among student groups across the LCFF priorities, including recognition for success and the ability to share promising practices.

Differentiated Assistance (Level 2) County superintendents, the California Department of Education, and the California Collaborative for Educational Excellence provide differentiated assistance for LEAs and schools, in the form of individually designed assistance, to address identified performance issues, including significant disparities in performance among student groups. Intensive Intervention (Level 3)

The Superintendent of Public Instruction may require more intensive interventions for LEAs and/or schools with persistent performance issues and a lack of improvement over a specified time period. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 12 Eligibility Criteria for Support Basics (LCFF Priority 1) Not Met for Two or More Years on Local Performance Indicator

Implementation of State Academic Standards (LCFF Priority 2) Not Met for Two or More Years on Local Indicator Parent Engagement (LCFF Priority 3) Not Met for Two or More Years on Local Indicator Pupil Engagement (LCFF Priority 5) Red on Graduation Rate Indicator or Red on Chronic Absence Indicator School Climate (LCFF Priority 6) Red on Suspension Rate Indicator or

Not Met for Two or More Years on Local Indicator Pupil Achievement (LCFF Priority 4) Red on both English Language Arts (ELA) and Math tests or Red on ELA or Math tests AND orange on the other test or Red on the English Learner Progress Indicator (English learner student group only) Access to and Outcomes in a Broad Course of Study (LCFF Priorities 7 & 8)

Red on College/Career Indicator TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 13 Priority 6: How it is Measured Jacquelyn Ollison, Education Administrator Office of the Chief Deputy TOM TORLAKSON

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Jen Taylor, Education Programs Consultant Expanded Learning Division State Indicator: Understanding the California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS) Data Behind School Climate Brandi Jauregui Information Technology Specialist Educational Data Management Division

TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction CALPADS Data Related to School Climate (1 of 2) Pupil suspension and expulsion rates are equal to: Count of students suspended or expelled (unduplicated) Divided By Cumulative enrollment count TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 16

CALPADS Data Related to School Climate (2 of 2) Student offenses committed outlined in Education Code sections 48900 and 48915 that result in: In- or out-of-school suspensions Expulsions Minimum of a full-day removals for general education students Any increment of a day for students with disabilities TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 17

Where Can These Rates be Found? (1 of 2) California School Dashboard https://www.caschooldashboard.org Suspension rates only TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 18 Where Can These Rates be Found? (2 of 2) DataQuest - https://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest Suspension and Expulsion Rates

TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 19 How are the Data Collected? Collected and stored throughout the school year in local student information systems (SIS) Data from the SIS are reported in the California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS) annually and represent offenses committed and the resulting disciplinary actions that occurred between July 1 and June 30 annually TOM TORLAKSON

State Superintendent of Public Instruction 20 When are the Data Collected? Collected in the End-of-Year 3 submission in CALPADS (Student Discipline) Data review and certification window opens in May and closes in mid-August annually LEAs may submit discipline data year-round TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction

21 Which Data are Collected? Data collected include (but are not limited to): Specific student offense(s) within an incident Incident date Disciplinary action (suspension, expulsion) Duration of the disciplinary action Any modifications made to the disciplinary action A complete list of required data elements can be found in the CALPADS File Specifications (Student Discipline section) on the CALPADS Systems Documentation web page at https://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/sp/cl/systemdocs.asp. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction

22 How to Ensure Accuracy of the Data (1 of 3) Local educational agencies (LEAs) should have a documented local process that ensures: Accurate documentation of the incident Which student(s) were involved in the incident? What specific offense(s) did each student commit? Accurate documentation of the outcome (disciplinary action) What was the final disciplinary action for the student? What was the duration of the disciplinary action? TOM TORLAKSON

State Superintendent of Public Instruction 23 How to Ensure Accuracy of the Data (2 of 3) Site administrators should be responsible for: Determining the appropriate offense code Determining the appropriate disciplinary action Ensuring staff responsible for data entry are appropriately trained Reviewing data prior to certification in CALPADS TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction

24 How to Ensure Accuracy of the Data (3 of 3) Allow all stakeholders ample time to review and update data prior to certifying reports in CALPADS Establish a reporting calendar that incorporates Data submission deadlines Data review and certification deadlines Staff responsible for review, submission, and certification TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction

25 Other Reminders State statute (Education Code Section 48900(k)(2)) prohibits Students in grades kindergarten through 3 to be suspended solely for defiance and disruption Students in grades kindergarten through 12 cannot be expelled solely for defiance or disruption. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 26

Using the Data to Address School Climate Issues State-level data systems and reporting sites are not intended to be early warning systems but can provide information on trends in schools and districts annually LEAs should use data stored in the local SIS to perform analysis on a more frequent basis E.g., provide monthly reports to site administrators on suspension and expulsion rates by subgroup Requires timely data entry and an emphasis on data quality and validation Many student information systems provide data analysis tools TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction

27 Training and Resources (1 of 2) End of Year (EOY) 2-3 - Reporting and Certification Self-Paced Training http://csis.fcmat.org//Pages/EOY-1-4-SP.aspx End of Year 3 Data Mapping Guides http ://csis.fcmat.org/Documents/TrainingResources/Job-Aides/Data-Mappi ng-Guides/End-Of-Year-3/EOY_3_Mapping_Guides.pdf TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 28

Training and Resources (2 of 2) How CALPADS Data are Used and Consequences http ://csis.fcmat.org/Documents/OtherResource/How_Certi fied_CALPADS_Data_are_Used_and_Consequences. pdf TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 29 Contact Information

CALPADS Service Desk [email protected] Or CALPADS/CBEDS/CDS Office [email protected] 916-324-1414 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 30 Local Indicators Jeff Breshears

Division Director Local Agency Systems Support Office TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Definition: Local Indicator For Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) priorities where data is not collected at the state level, an LEA will measure its progress with locally collected data, and report that progress through the Dashboard. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction

32 Why Local Indicators? Reflects the emphasis on local control LEAs measure priorities that are oriented more to implementation measurement rather than summative outcome Important for the local community to understand the holistic picture of an LEAs progress TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 33

The Dashboard Informs the Development of the LCAP (1) TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 34 Applicability of Local Indicators Local indicators apply only to LEAs, which are defined by LCFF statute as: School districts County offices of education Charter schools

Indicators, including local indicators, apply to charter schools for state accountability purposes only if the underlying charter petition includes goals for each of the related state priorities that apply to the grade levels served and the nature of the charter school program. Note: Local indicators do not apply to individual schools. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 35 School Climate

Local Indicator - Priority 6 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 36 Performance Standard - School Climate LEA administers a local climate survey at least every other year that provides a valid measure of perceptions of school safety and connectedness, such as the California Healthy Kids Survey (CHKS) Administers the survey to students in at least one grade within the grade span(s) that the LEA serves (e.g., K-5, 6-8, 9-12) Reports the results to its local governing board at a regularly scheduled

meeting and to stakeholders and the public by using a self-reflection tool shared through the Dashboard. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 37 Target Population Students at least one grade within the grade span (e.g., K-5, 6-8, 9-12) Staff all staff, both certificated and classified Parents Reach out to all parents, ensure that families from all student groups are

represented TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 38 What to Measure Survey students, staff, and parents regarding: Safety Perceived safety Physical and emotional safety Harassment and bullying Substance use

School Connectedness 5-question scale in the CHKS Student-staff caring relationships Student peer relationships TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 39 Reporting to the Governing Board Prior to finalizing this information in the Dashboard, the information must be reported at an LEAs regularly scheduled governing board meeting. Using the Dashboard Interface, LEAs can provide the results for the governing board to review.

View the Quick Reference Guide for Californias New Accountability System on the California Accountability Model & School Dashboard web page (Data Files and Guide section) at https://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/cm/. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 40 Reporting on the Dashboard (1 of 2) In the text box provided in the California School Dashboard, provide a narrative summary of the local administration and analysis of a local climate survey:

student perceptions of school safety and connectedness, parents and teachers on the sense of safety and school connectedness. include differences among student groups, and for surveys that provide an overall score, report the overall score for all students and student groups. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 41

Reporting on the Dashboard (2 of 2) As a recommended best practice, LEAs should report the results of their school conditions and climate tools on the Dashboard by including a URL to a district website that shows the school conditions and climate survey results, disaggregated by student groups, with a minimum nsize, for each school site, if applicable. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 42 Narrative Summary Guiding Questions Suggested guiding questions for the narrative summary:

Reflect on the key learnings from your results, and share what you learned. Review student group differences Compare student and staff responses Look at trend data Review parent responses What do the disaggregated results (if applicable) of the survey and other data collection methods reveal about schools in the LEA, such as areas of strength or growth, challenges, and barriers? TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 43 Informing LCAP Development

Using Local Indicator Data to Inform Planning TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 44 Beyond Surveys Dig deeper into the survey results by conducting interviews or focus groups to understand the why behind survey responses Review additional Dashboard data such as suspension and chronic absenteeism rates, by subgroup Use both quantitative and/or qualitative data to drive action-planning and decision making

TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 45 Responding to Results Guiding Question What revisions, decisions, or actions has, or will, the LEA implement in response to the results for continuous improvement purposes? Why? If you have already implemented actions, did you see the results you were seeking? TOM TORLAKSON

State Superintendent of Public Instruction 46 The Dashboard Informs the Development of the LCAP (2) TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 47 Questions or Comments? Please contact

Local Agency Systems Support Office [email protected] 916-319-0809 TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 48 Coming Soon Tuesdays at 2:00 TOM TORLAKSON

State Superintendent of Public Instruction 49 Tuesdays at 2:00 A Webinar Series A series of 6 webinars: Local Indicators What, How, and Why? Begins Tuesday, August 28, at 2 p.m. More information to come via the LCFF listserv To subscribe to the LCFF listserv, send a "blank" message to [email protected] TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction

50 Reflection Question (1) Please respond to the following by typing in the chat: Based on the information shared, what stood out to you? TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 51 Exemplar 1: Practitioner Perspective Riverside County Office of Education

Susan Levine, Ed.D., Director II Pupil and Administrative Services Division of Educational Services TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 52 Californias Multi-tiered System of Support (MTSS): Continuum of Support Riverside County subscribes to the alignment of systems necessary for all students academic, behavioral,

and social success. The Pupil and Administrative Services (PAS) unit targets the school climate indicator in its training for Child Welfare & Attendance (CWA) and school site staff and administrators. http://www.ocde.us/MTSS/Pages/Continuum-of-Support.aspx TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 53

Our Journey Districts were dissatisfied with their data.graduation rate, dropout data, suspension/expulsion, School Attendance Review Boards (SARB) cases, absenteeism, truancy, CHKS. DataQuest data, in conjunction with their California Dashboard data, sparked the districts requests for more targeted training in the area of school climate. Disproportionality among student groups was a great concern. The CWA Directors Network, in a Gallery Walk exercise, identified types of trainings that they believed their staff would benefit from in these areas. The PAS administrators pulled from their networks and their colleagues networks to plan a years worth of targeted school climate training. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction

54 School Climate/Social-Emotional Learning Trainings (1 of 3) Multi-tiered System Of Support (MTSS)/ Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) Tier I,II,III Capturing Kids Hearts CWA Topics Boot Camp Trauma Informed Care Youth Mental Health First Aid Teen Self-Injury Suicide Prevention Drugs and Vaping

Restorative Processes Investigations, Searches and Due Process Universal Design for Learning Olweus Bullying Prevention TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 55 School Climate/Social-Emotional Learning Trainings (2 of 3) MTSS/Attendance How to Conduct a Great SARB Meeting SARB Certification

Restorative Practices in the Attendance Process Model SARB App Records Training Individualized Training at Your District TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 56 School Climate/Social-Emotional Learning Trainings (3 of 3) Implicit Bias/Cultural Competency Navigating Difference (Washington State University)

Network Meetings For CWAs Two CBO Presentations Leg Update Hot Topics Agency Updates Burning Questions in a Hat TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 57 RESOURCES WestEd will provide your school with a school climate index report if you give the Healthy Kids

Survey. Check out the toolkit on the California Safe and Supportive Schools website. http://californias3.wested.org/tools/ Check out the National School Climate Center website. https://www.schoolclimate.org/ Consider adding a book club school climate activity to your professional learning community. (i.e., School Climate: Leading with Collective Efficacy, DeWitt, Peter) Check out the Alliance for the Study of School Climate at California State University, Los Angeles. http://web.calstatela.edu/centers/schoolclimate/ Research trainings at the International Institute of Restorative Practices. https://www.iirp.edu/ TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 58

Exemplar 2: Student Perspective Spencer Lara, 12th grade student Lakewood High School (Long Beach) Californians for Justice TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 59 School Climate School Climate impacts the way students show up in their classroom and on campus

Students are experts School climate surveys are a good start, but cant be the only thing We need to focus on racial bias, supporting teachers and staff, student and adult teams to lead together TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 60 Californians for Justice student leaders with Assembly Member Kevin McCarty lobbying at the state capitol for investment in community engagement and school climate

TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 61 Relationship Centered Schools What is it? A Relationship Centered School breaks down the cycles of racial bias and inequity in our schools by supporting educators and students to build relationships that embrace and empower all students to pursue their

dreams. They are schools that invest in school staff, value student voice, and create space for relationship building. Cabrillo Case study Key outcomes: Shared studentteacher-admin decision making space 3 practices in the next year: Wellness center Streamlining social emotional learning practices through school climate and restorative justice plans Qualitative data to supplement

school climate surveys TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 62 What is Coming Up Next at Californians for Justice? Supporting Lakewood High School (LBUSD) and 10 other schools across 4 districts Growing the Relationship Centered Schools movement statewide Advocating for local and state policies like teacher retention, increased funding

TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 63 Californians for Justice Resources Californians for Justice website: caljustice.org/believeinme Social media Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cal4justice/?hl=en Twitter: https://twitter.com/cal4justice?lang=en Contact Norma Rodriguez: [email protected]

TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 64 Resources for Implementation Part 1 Kristen Brown, Ph.D. One System Whole Child Initiative Lead California Department of Education TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction

One System of Connected Resources & Supports TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction One System Initiative Purpose Support capacity of the CDE and local educational agencies (LEAs) to better achieve the goals of the LCFF Priorities. Prioritize supports for CDE-led aligned initiatives, and resources to support the field. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction

67 Background LCFF Implementation One System Serving the Whole Child TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 68 Local Control Funding Formula/ Whole Child Resource Map

Each ray represents one Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP) priority. One star represents one child who is surrounded by those who want to ensure the childs daily safety and health, and ensure that every child is engaged, challenged, and uniquely supported. From cradle to career, the CDE has resources that support the work of LEAs and make the goals of each priority attainable. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction

69 LCFF Priorities/Whole Child Resource Map (1 of 2) Local Control Funding Formula Priorities/Whole Child Resource Map https://www.cde.ca.gov/eo/in/lcff1sys-resources.asp Collaboration in Common https://collaborationincommon.org TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 70 LCFF Priorities/Whole Child Resource Map (2 of 2)

TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 71 Resources for Implementation Part 2 Tom Herman Education Administrator Coordinated School Health and Safety Office TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction

Resources: Safe Schools (1 of 2) Safe schools: Provides training, resources, and technical assistance to establish a school/community environment which is physically and emotionally safe, well disciplined, and conducive to learning. View the Safe Schools web page at https ://www.cde.ca.gov/ls/ss/. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 73

Resources: Safe Schools (2 of 2) TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 74 Resources: Safe and Supportive Schools (1 of 2) Safe and Supportive Schools: Supports statewide measurement of conditions for learning (school climate) and targeted programmatic interventions to improve those conditions. View the Safe and Supportive Schools web page at https:// www.cde.ca.gov/ls/ss/se/safesupportive.asp.

TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 75 Resources: Safe and Supportive Schools (2 of 2) TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 76 Resources: School Environment (1 of 2)

School Environment: Provides training, resources, and technical assistance in the establishment of a school/community environment that is physically and emotionally safe, well disciplined, and conducive to learning. View the School Environment web page at https ://www.cde.ca.gov/ls/ss/se/. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 77 Resources: School Environment (2 of 2)

TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 78 Resources: Positive School Climate (1 of 2) Positive School Climate: Information regarding the importance of positive school climate and resources to improve school climate. View the CDEs web page on Positive School Climate at https ://www.cde.ca.gov/ls/ss/se/schoolclimate.asp. TOM TORLAKSON

State Superintendent of Public Instruction 79 Resources: Positive School Climate (2 of 2) TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 80 Resources: Social Emotional Learning (1 of 2) Social Emotional Learning: Provides resources on Social and Emotional Learning to help

students develop a range of skills they need for school and life. View the Social and Emotional Learning web page at https:// www.cde.ca.gov/eo/in/socialemotionallearning.asp. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 81 Resources: Social Emotional Learning (2 of 2) TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction

82 Continuous Improvement: Resource Map Feedback Survey TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 83 Continuous Improvement: Professional Development Survey TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction

84 Next Steps TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 85 Mapping Bright Spots Purpose: To identify and map Bright Spots to promote continuous improvement activities that are grounded in outstanding field experience. Bright Spot exemplars will be used to support peer-to-peer learning between

districts, schools, and educators. Potential Bright Spots could include programs, practices, instructional models, platforms, or tools. TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 86 Connecting Tom Herman, Administrator Coordinated School Health & Safety [email protected] Kristen Brown, One System Whole Child Initiative One System Website

http://www.cde.ca.gov/eo/in/onesystem.asp Email [email protected] TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 87 Reflection Question (2) Please respond to the following by typing in the chat: Based on the information shared, what resonates with you? TOM TORLAKSON

State Superintendent of Public Instruction 88 Thoughts from the State Superintendent of Public Instruction on School Climate Tom Torlakson TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction Coming Soon: CDE EdTalks a Podcast

A new podcast featuring conversations about education related topics that is produced, edited, and published by the CDEs Communications Department * Logo subject to change TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 90 Reminders Look out for the Tuesdays at 2:00 webinar and the next Priority X webinar

CDE EdTalks Podcast coming soon Sign-up for the following mailing lists to receive more information about the topics shared today: LCFF: https://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/aa/lc/index.asp One System/Whole Child: [email protected] SBE: [email protected] TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction 91 Priority X: A Webinar Series Dedicated to the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) State Priorities

Todays Topic: Priority 6School Climate Thank you! TOM TORLAKSON State Superintendent of Public Instruction

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