Fashion History - Springfield Public Schools

Fashion History B.C. to Present Times B.C. Fashions of this period come from several groups in existence at this time: Egyptians, Cretes, Greeks, Romans, and Byzantine. Most is known about Egyptian fashion due to their burial procedures. Linen was used exclusively as a textile with the Egyptians because it was all were able to grow in their area.

Egyptian Fashions The Shenti was the loincloth worn by Egyptian men. The Kalasiris was a linen gown worn by Egyptian women. Movies representing the B.C. Time Period Cleopatra* The Mummy

A.D. Movies 500-1050 The Knights of the Round Table Sword of Lancelot First Knight Camelot Monty Python and the Holy Grail (932 AD) 1200-1300s, 13th & 14th Century The Bliaud was a dress worn by woman or men in this time period. 1200-1300s

The Hennin, was worn in the 14th and 15th century, was a cone-like hat resembling the spires of the cathedral spire. The Tunic was often one of the stylistic features of the classic businessman. Movies Representing the 13th and 14th Centuries Robin Hood (1100)

Braveheart (late 1200s) 1400-1500s the 15 & 16 Century Fashion in this era was greatly influenced by the high class society and the European Kings and Queens. The Surcoat was a popular fashion accessory for the men of this era. Peasants had a lot of different clothing styles because each particular style

identified the woman with her hometown. 1400-1500s Women of this time used Pregnancy Pillows when the maternal look was fashionable. Men of this time wore a Codpiece, a decorative triangular piece of fabric attached at the groin. 1400s-1500s The Farthingale was a stiff metal cone-shaped

article worn under skirts, while the Ruff was a large stiff collar worn at this time. Farthingale Ruff Movies Representing the th th 15

& 16 Centuries Shakespeare in Love Taming of the Shrew* Ever After* The Three Musketeers The Hunchback of Notre Dame Joan of Arc: A Portrait of a Legend (1428 France) The Princess Bride Snow White (Disney) Sleeping Beauty (Disney) Willow The Sword and the Rose (Disney; about Princess Margaret, sister to Henry VIII)

The Mission (late 1500s South America) 1600s The French Courtiers influence for this time was a fashion which said I dont have to work for a living. The Puritan costumes were very simple. When religious values are ascendant, dress becomes austere. 1600s Fashions In Denmark the Short Jacket and Breeches were the style of the day. Movies representing the

17th Century Much Ado About Nothing* Romeo and Juliet* Hamlet* 1700s The 1700s started with the drastic extension of both the hips and the hair for women. Women were beginning to make contributions to society by becoming writers, business women, artists and doctors. The drastic visual

display of their dress was a spectacle which far outweighed the proportions of a man. 1700s This shows the hoop and mask used under a ladies dress to extend the hips drastically. 1770s Hair was piled high on the head in the Pompadour style and atop the mountain of hair (which usually included pieces of someone elses hair called a Rat) sat large hats topped with feathers, bows and

ribbons. 1700s The Justaucorps for men was the forerunner of todays suitcoat. The Spencer was a short jacket without tails. 1700s Near the end of the 1700s women began to wear dresses that followed the simple lines

of the Greek silhouette. The hair softened at this time as well. Women left behind the corset for a brief time. 1790, Napoleons sisters Movies representing the 18th Century Amadeus (1750)* (Mozart 1756 1791) Emma (1816)* Catherine the Great The Aristocrats

1800s Fashion at this time went through some very distinct changes. The 19th century starts with the Greek influence, then woman gradually add to the dress until the Greek is not noticeable. The corset returns! The high society had rich fashions, while the common people dressed simply. It was an era of romance and manners 1800s The well-dressed man of the nineteenth centruy England was called a Dandy. The well-dressed woman wore a large bell-shaped skirt supported by crinoline. The Worth creation brought the

fullness of womens skirts around to the back. 1820 1850 1880 1890s Exaggerated Hourglass 1895, Paris 1895 Moments that effected

Time: Civil War 1861 - 1865 1890s Gibson Girl Artists sketches of young women by Charles Dana Gibson, known as the Gibson Girls, were published in

newspapers and set the standard for the allAmerican girl. 1890s The exaggerated Hourglass was the silhouette style of this decade. Shoulders were wide, waists were cinched in unmercifully by corsets and the hip was incredibly increased

by the bustle. Movies Representing the 19th Century Gone With the Wind * (1860 1870) Little Women * (1861 1870) Far and Away* (1892) Bibliography Cotehardie & HouppelandeHomepage, http://www.pipcom.com/~tempus/cotelande/index.html, 2 Dec 2003. article(s) > le costume, http://www.encyclo.voila.fr/cgi-bin/doc? id=ni_1459.26&type=2&page=0 1966 Stark Raving Mod!, http://www.geocities.com/FashionAvenue/5362/The Sixties by Arthur Markham

Timeline of costume historyhttp://www.costumes.org/pages/timelinepages/timeline.htm The History of Fashion and Dress,http://www.costumes.org/pages/fashiondress/18thCent.htm http://www.fashion-era.com/flapper_fashion_1920's.htm#The%20Flapper State University College Dept. Of Human Ecology, Fashion 224 History Of Costume 1910's, http://members.tripod.com/fash224/1910.html, A Briefe History of the Codpiece , http://www.onr.com/user/steveh/cods.htm Abadeha, the Philippine Cinderella, by Myrna J. de la Paz. Los Angeles: Pazific Queen, 1991 Ashpet: an Appalachian Tale, retold by Joanne Compton, illustrated by Kenn Compton. Holiday House, 1994. Baba Yaga and Vasilisa the Brave, as told by Marianna Mayer, illustrated by K. Y. Craft. Morrow Junior Books, 1994. (Russian) Billy Beg and his Bull: an Irish Tale, retold by Ellin Greene, illustrated by Kimberly Bulcken Root. Holiday House, 1994.

Boots and the Glass Mountain, by Claire Martin. Dial Books, 1992. (Norway) Chinye: a West African Folk Tale, retold by Obi Onyefulu; illustrated by Evie Safarewicz, 1994. Cinder Edna, by Ellen Jackson, illustrated by Kevin O'Malley. Lothrop, 1994. Cinder-Elly, by Frances Minters, illustrated by G. Brian Karas. Viking, 1994. (Rap version) Cinderella, adapted from Perrault's Cendrillon by John Fowles; illustrated by Sheilah Beckett. Little Brown, 1974. Cinderella, or, The Little Glass Slipper,a free translation from the French of Chales Perrault, illustrated by Marcia Brown. Scribner, 1954 (Caldecott medal winner) Cinderella, retold by David Delamare. Simon & Schuster, 1993. (Illustrations are Venetian inspired. The prince is named Fidelio) Cinderella, illustrated by Paul Galdone. McGraw-Hill, 1978. Cinderella, retold from The Brothers Grimm and illustrated by Nonny Hogrogian. Greenwillow Books, 1981. Cinderella, retold by Amy Ehrlich; illustrated by Susan Jeffers. Dial Books for Young Readers, 1985. (From the Charles Perrault version) Cinderella, illustrated by Roberto Innocenti. Creative Education, 1983. (From the Charles Perrault version; illustrations set in the 1920's) Cinderella, by Barbara Karlin; illustrated by James Marshall. Little Brown, 1989. Cinderella, illustrated by Moira Kemp, 1981.

Cinderella, or, The Little Glass Slipper, illustrated by Errol Le Cain. Bradbury Press, 1972. (Charles Perrault) Cinderella: from the Opera by Rossini, written and illustrated by Beni Montresor. Knopf, 1965. Cinderella, retold by C.S. Evans; illustrated by Arthur Rackham. Knopf, 1993. (Originally published in 1919 by Heinemann) Cinderella, translated by Anne Rogers (from the Grimm version), illustrated by Otto Svend. Larousse, 1978. Cinderella, by William Wegman, with Carole Kismaric and Marvin Heiferman Hyperion, 1993. (Told with photos of costumed Weimaraners) Cinderella Penguin, or, The Little Glass Flipper, by Janet Perlman, 1992. The Cinderella Rebus Book, Ann Morris, 1989. Cinderella's Stepsister, and, Cinderella: the Untold Story, as told by Russell Shorto, illustrated by T. Lewis. Carol Pub. Group, 1990. (A standard version back-to-back with a version by the "evil" stepsister) The Egyptian Cinderella, by Shirley Climo, illustrated by Ruth Heller. HarperCollins, 1989. Ellen Foster by Kaye Gibbons. Vintage Contemporaries, 1987. (See Melinda Franklin's article) The Enchanted Anklet: A Cinderella Story from India translated and adapted by Lila Mehta, illustrated by Neela Chhaniara. Toronto: Lilmur, 1985. The Glass Slipper, by Eleanor and Herbert Farjeon, illustrated by Hugh Stevenson. Wingate, 1946. (A novel-length version)

The Golden Slipper: a Vietnamese Legend, by Darrell Lum, illustrated by Makiko Nagano. Troll, 1994. In the Land of Small Dragon: A Vietnamese Folktale, told by Dang Manh Kha to Ann Nolan Clark, illustrated by Tony Chen. Viking Press, 1979. Kao and the Golden Fish: a Folktale from Thailand, as remembered by Wilai Punpattanakul-Crouch retold by Cheryl Hamada, illustrated by Monica Liu. Chidren's Press, 1993. Korean Cinderella, story edited by Edward B. Adams, illustrations by Dong Ho Choi. Seoul International Tourist Pub. Co., 1983. The Korean Cinderella, by Shirley Climo, 1993. Lily and the Wooden Bowl, Alan Schroeder, illustrated by Yoriko Ito. Doubleday, 1994. (Japan) Little Firefly: an Algonquin Legend, written and adapted by Terri Cohlene, illustrated by Charles Reasoner. Rourke Corp., 1990. Moss Gown, by William D. Hooks, illustrated by Donald Carrick. Clarion Books, 1987. (Southern U.S.) Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters: An African Tale, by John Steptoe. Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1987. (Zimbabwe) Nomi and the Magic Fish: a Story from Africa, by Phumla, illustrated by Carole Byard. Doubleday, 1972. (Zulu) Prince Cinders, by Babette Cole, 1987. Princess Furball, by Charlotte Huck; illustrated by Anita Lobel. Scholastic, 1989. Queen of the May, by Steven Kroll, illustrated by Patience Brewster. Holiday House, 1993

The Rough-Face Girl, by Rafe Martin, illustrated by David Shannon. Putnam, 1992. (Algonquin Indian) Sidney Rella and the Glass Sneaker, by Bernice Myers. Macmillan, 1985. Silver Woven in My Hair, by Shirley Rousseau Murphy. Atheneum, 1977. (Novel-length) Sootface: an Ojibwa Cinderella Story, retold by Robert D. San Souci, illustrated by Daniel San Souci. Doubleday Book for Young Readers, 1994. The Starlight Cloak, retold by Jenny Nimmo, pictures by Justin Todd. Dial Book for Young Readers, 1993. The Talking Eggs: a Folktale from the American South, by Robert San Souci; illustrated by Jerry Pinkney. Dial Books for Young Readers, 1989. Tam Cam: The Vietnamese Cinderella Story by The Goi. Tattercoats, retold by Margaret Greaves, illustrated by Margaret Chamberlain. Clarkson N. Potter, 1990. Tattercoats, edited by Joseph Jacobs; illustrated by Margot Tomes. Putnam, 1989. Tattercoats: an Old English Tale, by Flora Annie Steel; illustrated by Diane Goode. Bradbury Press, 1976. The Turkey Girl: a Zuni Cinderella, retold by Penny Pollock; illustrated by Ed Young. Little, Brown, 1995. Vasalisa and her Magic Doll, adapted and illustrated by Rita Grauer. Philomel Books, 1994. (Russia) Vasilisa the Beautiful, translated from the Russian by Thomas Whitney; illustrated by Nonny Hogrogian. Macmillan, 1970. Vasilissa the Beautiful: A Russian Folktale, adapted by Elizabeth Winthrop, illustrated by Alexander Koskkin. HarperCollins, 1991.

When the Nightingale Sings, by Joyce Carol Thomas. HarperCollins, 1992. (Novel-length) Wishbones: A Folktale from China, retold by Barbara Ker Wilson; illustrated by Meilo So. Bradbury, 1993. Yeh-Shen, a Cinderella Tale from China, by Ai-Ling Louie; illustrated by Ed Young. Philomel Books, 1982. Fashion History 1900s 1950s 1900s S-Curve The silhouette softened into the S-shaped curve with softer shoulders, less restrictive corsets, and the bustle, never returned. The three-piece suit for

gentlemen was introduced. The suit was relatively non constricting with a sack coat, simple vest, and pleated trousers. In 1906 the permanent wave was developed. 1900s 1903 1900s, Bloomers & Bicycles

Life began to move at a faster pace with many new inventions, such as the telephone, electric light, and the automobile, that gave people more luxury and freedom. The new two-wheeled cycle, was the craze of the country. Amelia Bloomer designed a practical outfit for the avid cyclist consisting of a tunic dress worn over loose trousers gathered at the ankle. Later this was revised into a split skirt with

gathers under the knee, called Bloomers. 1896 Bicycle Dress 1900s The Bathing Suit The one piece bathing suit was introduced by Annette Kellerman which shocked the world. Movies that represent 19001910

Meet me in St. Louis Anne of Green Gables 1910s Men and women wore Dustcoats to protect their clothing when driving or riding in cars. Events that effected the time: World War I 1914 - 1918

World War I & Fashion World War I saw fashion come to a standstill with patriotism at an all-time high. During and at the end of WWI. The barrel silhouette or tonneau look comes in. It is a baggy dress/jacket combination that made women look large

and droopy in the chest. Womens Movement The womens movement demanded the right to vote, wear make-up, cut their hair short for the first time in a Bobbed style, and wear skirts above the ankle. 1910s The Hobble Skirt

French designer Paul Poiret broke the new rule of freedom by designing the Hobble Skirt. The hemline was so narrow that women could only take very tiny steps. The Pope spoke out in defense of the women, so Poiret split the skirt to the knee, bringing a response of outrage from the public. Movies that represent

1910s Anne of Avonlea* Titanic* Somewhere In Time 1920s Tubular Life began to move ahead and fast. The fashion silhouette at this time was straight up and down or Tubular. The brassiere was introduced, but it was used to flatten the figure, not uplift or enhance it.

Safe make-up, costume jewelry, and suntans were in great demand. Flapper vs. Thinking Woman The Flapper wore a headband around her forehead,

usually with a feather in front. Her face was powdered, her skirt was the shortest in history, and her knees were rouged. Silk stockings were the rage; they were rolled down just above the knee.

The Thinking Woman was college educated and considered herself to be the opposite of the flapper. Her dress was emancipated but not

extreme. Influence of England The Prince was the ultimate trend setter of the 1920s He often wore Oxford bags, extremely wide trousers, often reaching 25

inches at the knee and cuffed at the bottom. Cardigan sweater, plus-fours/ oxford bags, argyle socks, wingtip shoes, club stripe tie. Edward 8th Prince of Wales the major social mediator of

fashion. Shown here in a suit and overcoat, ascot at the neck. 1920s - Designers Paul Poiret vowed, I will strive for omission, not addition. This he did with dresses which hung from the shoulders to the wiast, with soft, silky, flowing, sheer fabrics. Coco Chanel made a hit in fashion using black and navy in

simple frill-free designs. She said, Each frill discarded makes one look younger. Events that effected the Time: Good times ended with the crash of the stock market, which led to the Great Depression. Crash in 1929. Movies that represent 1920s The Great Gatsby*

Singing in the Rain* Thoroughly Modern Millie 1930s Depression Era The Depression brought about the classic styles in suits and dresses, clothing that would last a long time and stay in style. The shirtwaist dress was one such classic. Hand-me-downs became fashionable not only for thrifty families, but for everyone.

Separate skirts and blouses were a highlight, with a white blouse being a must in any wardrobe. Flap sacks held the powder compact for womens makeup. Depression babies had layettes sewn from sugar sacks while school children often wore underwear embellished with the trademarks of Pillsbury flour. combination, were the fashion in millinery wear. 1930s Hemlines Hemlines in the 1930s went down and down again. By

the end of the 1930s fashion seemed to stand still in the shadow of impending war. 1930s on the Bias Bias cut gowns were popular for evening wear. 1930s and Movie Stars!

Attention to actresses offstage clothing probably reached its fever pitch with the ensembles created for Gloria Swanson.

Ginger Rodgers in a Cowl Neck. Jean Harlow 1930s Sportswear Pants for women, flared at hem, worn for extreme casual wear only. Also called beach pajamas. Movies that represent the 30s Annie*

Wild Hearts Cant Be Broken* 1940s World War II (1939-1945) effects fashion directly in this time period. L85 was a law which restricted the manufacture of clothing. Ruffles were forbidden. Only one pocket per blouse or shirt was allowed. Hems could be no deeper than 2 inches and the widest part of the hem of a dress could not exceed 72 inches. Hemlines rose and leveled off just below the knee. For men several things were removed: cuffs, vests, 2 pant suits, patch pockets, cloth belts, and pleats. War Restrictions

Not only fashion was restricted but food was rationed. 1.Food Rations for 1 Week for 1 Person 4oz bacon or ham 8oz sugar 2oz tea 2oz jam spread 1oz cheese 1 shilling's worth of meat 8oz fats of which only 2oz could be butter Later sweets and tinned goods could be had on a

points system. Bread was not rationed until post war in 1946. Stockings, which were not required under pants, were expensive and usually not available. Women in this picture are shown painting their legs to appear to have nylons on. 1940s With the fashion industry closed down by

the war in Europe, the U.S. was left to its own designers for fashion direction. The designers turned to the military for inspiration. The Eisenhower jacket made fashion history as it was adopted for civilian use. The shoulders were roomy and cofortable. The bomber jacket was based on the Air Corps flying coat made of leather with knit wrist cuffs to keep out the wind. It was usually lined with alpaca fur. The Montgomery beret was the inspiration for hats. Elastic could not be used so a close fitting hat was the sensible choice.

This woman was married in a suit quickly for her husband to be shipped out. broad shoulders & Thin hips Women began to wear pants as he practical dress for work in industry. It was not too long before pants were popular outside the workplace as a comfortable casual fashion. The fashion at this time was very manly and

the fabric was sensible tweed. The shoulder was square, wide and padded. Suit dresses were very popular and saddle stitching ws a favorite trim. Men wore colors reflecting the time: khaki and other muted colors. Influence on Women The women were thrown into the workplace and then told to leave once the men returned. However, women

now had their eyes open to the opportunities available to them. The New Look In 1947, a French designer, Christian Dior launched what he called The New Look. The war was over, the men had returned home, and The New Look gave women a softer, more feminine look and curve. This look was stylish, elegant, and reflected the

opposite of wartime restrictions. The hemlines fell to just above he ankle and skirts were incredibly full. Yards and yards of fabric were used as well as petticoats with crinoline and flounces of lace. The shoulder pad was dropped with a thud and the sloping, soft shoulder replaced the squared, manly look. The bustline was accented; the waistline was high and cinched in again. Moments that changed Time: World War II 1939 - 1945

Movies that represent the 40s A League of Their Own* Memphis Belle* I.Q.* Bibliography

Cotehardie & HouppelandeHomepage, http://www.pipcom.com/~tempus/cotelande/index.html, 2 Dec 2003. article(s) > le costume, http://www.encyclo.voila.fr/cgi-bin/doc? id=ni_1459.26&type=2&page=0 1966 Stark Raving Mod!, http://www.geocities.com/FashionAvenue/5362/The Sixties by Arthur Markham Timeline of costume historyhttp://www.costumes.org/pages/timelinepages/timeline.htm The History of Fashion and Dress,http://www.costumes.org/pages/fashiondress/18thCent.htm http://www.fashion-era.com/flapper_fashion_1920's.htm#The%20Flapper State University College Dept. Of Human Ecology, Fashion 224 History Of Costume 1910's,

http://members.tripod.com/fash224/1910.html, A Briefe History of the Codpiece , http://www.onr.com/user/steveh/cods.htm

Abadeha, the Philippine Cinderella, by Myrna J. de la Paz. Los Angeles: Pazific Queen, 1991 Ashpet: an Appalachian Tale, retold by Joanne Compton, illustrated by Kenn Compton. Holiday House, 1994. Baba Yaga and Vasilisa the Brave, as told by Marianna Mayer, illustrated by K. Y. Craft. Morrow Junior Books, 1994. (Russian) Billy Beg and his Bull: an Irish Tale, retold by Ellin Greene, illustrated by Kimberly Bulcken Root. Holiday House, 1994. Boots and the Glass Mountain, by Claire Martin. Dial Books, 1992. (Norway) Chinye: a West African Folk Tale, retold by Obi Onyefulu; illustrated by Evie Safarewicz, 1994. Cinder Edna, by Ellen Jackson, illustrated by Kevin O'Malley. Lothrop, 1994. Cinder-Elly, by Frances Minters, illustrated by G. Brian Karas. Viking, 1994. (Rap version) Cinderella, adapted from Perrault's Cendrillon by John Fowles; illustrated by Sheilah Beckett. Little Brown, 1974. Cinderella, or, The Little Glass Slipper,a free translation from the French of Chales Perrault, illustrated by Marcia Brown. Scribner, 1954

(Caldecott medal winner) Cinderella, retold by David Delamare. Simon & Schuster, 1993. (Illustrations are Venetian inspired. The prince is named Fidelio) Cinderella, illustrated by Paul Galdone. McGraw-Hill, 1978. Cinderella, retold from The Brothers Grimm and illustrated by Nonny Hogrogian. Greenwillow Books, 1981. Cinderella, retold by Amy Ehrlich; illustrated by Susan Jeffers. Dial Books for Young Readers, 1985. (From the Charles Perrault version) Cinderella, illustrated by Roberto Innocenti. Creative Education, 1983. (From the Charles Perrault version; illustrations set in the 1920's) Cinderella, by Barbara Karlin; illustrated by James Marshall. Little Brown, 1989. Cinderella, illustrated by Moira Kemp, 1981. Cinderella, or, The Little Glass Slipper, illustrated by Errol Le Cain. Bradbury Press, 1972. (Charles Perrault) Cinderella: from the Opera by Rossini, written and illustrated by Beni Montresor. Knopf, 1965. Cinderella, retold by C.S. Evans; illustrated by Arthur Rackham. Knopf, 1993. (Originally published in 1919 by Heinemann) Cinderella, translated by Anne Rogers (from the Grimm version), illustrated by Otto Svend. Larousse, 1978. Cinderella, by William Wegman, with Carole Kismaric and Marvin Heiferman Hyperion, 1993. (Told with photos of costumed Weimaraners) Cinderella Penguin, or, The Little Glass Flipper, by Janet Perlman, 1992.

The Cinderella Rebus Book, Ann Morris, 1989. Cinderella's Stepsister, and, Cinderella: the Untold Story, as told by Russell Shorto, illustrated by T. Lewis. Carol Pub. Group, 1990. (A standard version back-to-back with a version by the "evil" stepsister) The Egyptian Cinderella, by Shirley Climo, illustrated by Ruth Heller. HarperCollins, 1989. Ellen Foster by Kaye Gibbons. Vintage Contemporaries, 1987. (See Melinda Franklin's article)

The Enchanted Anklet: A Cinderella Story from India translated and adapted by Lila Mehta, illustrated by Neela Chhaniara. Toronto: Lilmur, 1985. The Glass Slipper, by Eleanor and Herbert Farjeon, illustrated by Hugh Stevenson. Wingate, 1946. (A novel-length version) The Golden Slipper: a Vietnamese Legend, by Darrell Lum, illustrated by Makiko Nagano. Troll, 1994.

In the Land of Small Dragon: A Vietnamese Folktale, told by Dang Manh Kha to Ann Nolan Clark, illustrated by Tony Chen. Viking Press, 1979. Kao and the Golden Fish: a Folktale from Thailand, as remembered by Wilai Punpattanakul-Crouch retold by Cheryl Hamada, illustrated by Monica Liu. Chidren's Press, 1993. Korean Cinderella, story edited by Edward B. Adams, illustrations by Dong Ho Choi. Seoul International Tourist Pub. Co., 1983. The Korean Cinderella, by Shirley Climo, 1993. Lily and the Wooden Bowl, Alan Schroeder, illustrated by Yoriko Ito. Doubleday, 1994. (Japan) Little Firefly: an Algonquin Legend, written and adapted by Terri Cohlene, illustrated by Charles Reasoner. Rourke Corp., 1990. Moss Gown, by William D. Hooks, illustrated by Donald Carrick. Clarion Books, 1987. (Southern U.S.) Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters: An African Tale, by John Steptoe. Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1987. (Zimbabwe) Nomi and the Magic Fish: a Story from Africa, by Phumla, illustrated by Carole Byard. Doubleday, 1972. (Zulu) Prince Cinders, by Babette Cole, 1987. Princess Furball, by Charlotte Huck; illustrated by Anita Lobel. Scholastic, 1989. Queen of the May, by Steven Kroll, illustrated by Patience Brewster. Holiday House, 1993 The Rough-Face Girl, by Rafe Martin, illustrated by David Shannon. Putnam, 1992. (Algonquin Indian)

Sidney Rella and the Glass Sneaker, by Bernice Myers. Macmillan, 1985. Silver Woven in My Hair, by Shirley Rousseau Murphy. Atheneum, 1977. (Novel-length) Sootface: an Ojibwa Cinderella Story, retold by Robert D. San Souci, illustrated by Daniel San Souci. Doubleday Book for Young Readers, 1994. The Starlight Cloak, retold by Jenny Nimmo, pictures by Justin Todd. Dial Book for Young Readers, 1993. The Talking Eggs: a Folktale from the American South, by Robert San Souci; illustrated by Jerry Pinkney. Dial Books for Young Readers, 1989. Tam Cam: The Vietnamese Cinderella Story by The Goi. Tattercoats, retold by Margaret Greaves, illustrated by Margaret Chamberlain. Clarkson N. Potter, 1990. Tattercoats, edited by Joseph Jacobs; illustrated by Margot Tomes. Putnam, 1989. Tattercoats: an Old English Tale, by Flora Annie Steel; illustrated by Diane Goode. Bradbury Press, 1976. The Turkey Girl: a Zuni Cinderella, retold by Penny Pollock; illustrated by Ed Young. Little, Brown, 1995. Vasalisa and her Magic Doll, adapted and illustrated by Rita Grauer. Philomel Books, 1994. (Russia) Vasilisa the Beautiful, translated from the Russian by Thomas Whitney; illustrated by Nonny Hogrogian. Macmillan, 1970. Vasilissa the Beautiful: A Russian Folktale, adapted by Elizabeth Winthrop, illustrated by Alexander Koskkin. HarperCollins, 1991. When the Nightingale Sings, by Joyce Carol Thomas. HarperCollins, 1992. (Novel-length)

Wishbones: A Folktale from China, retold by Barbara Ker Wilson; illustrated by Meilo So. Bradbury, 1993. Yeh-Shen, a Cinderella Tale from China, by Ai-Ling Louie; illustrated by Ed Young. Philomel Books, 1982. Fashion History 1960s Present Day 1960s A-Line The 60s opened with the simple A-line dress. Most dresses were very simple and so accessories were both expressive and bold.

Some fashion history writers have called this era the Great masquerade. 1960s Eyes were lined with black, shadowed with frosty white, and topped off with a full set of false eyelashes. Lips were painted light to white. Twiggy was the top model. She was long and lean, which was a break from the fleshed

Edwardian beauty seen in some form up through the 1950s 1960 Everything seemed to go. The length might be mini, micro-mini, midi, or maxi. Even mixing these lengths was fashionable; a mini skirt with a maxi coat

or vest. Maxi coats and sweater coats were really practical in cold climates for the mini skirt wearer. The warbabies or Baby Boomers, infants born immediately after the war ended in 1945, were maturing. By 1960 teenagers were a powerful group. In France, by the 1960s one-third of the population was under the age of 20. In the United States, fully one-half of the population was under 25. This enormous group of energetic young also had their own minds for fashion and were not dictated to by Paris or by anyone else.

1960s A-Line The 1960s was a time of action, violence, protest, rebellion, experimentation, and counterculture. Dramatic events took place during this decade and dramatic changes in fashion occurred. The 60-70s catered to the youth both in advertising and production in the clothing industry. Teenagers had money to spend (3.5 billion on apparel in 1965,) and enjoyed keeping up with the latest trends. During these years two sets of fashion developed side by

side: fashion for the young and fashion for the rest of society. 1960 No other landmark of the 60s was the pants suit. Women had attempted pants since the days of Mrs. Bloomer. Chanel, in the 1930s made them acceptable as sportswear and during the war years overall and jeans were a practical necessity. But trousers for women always had decided overtones of the resort or the assembly line. They had never been totally respectable. A major fashion breakthrough of the late 60s was the

tailored pants suit. It was seen everywhere and was chic, elegant, comfortable, and convenient, not to mention practical. Movements of the 60s Civil Rights There were three major movements during the 60s that helped to shape fashion: First The Civil Rights Movement sparked an impressive move to ethnic fashion. Blacks and whites alike found interest in the African colors and prints. Afro hairstyles

were worn by most blacks and some whites used perms to get the Afro hairstyle. Some Afros could be measured at 3 inches above the scalp going straight up and straight out. Most were shorter and more natural looking. The expression of the day was Black is Beautiful. Womens Liberation Second The Womens Liberation Movement caused women to burn their bras and wear mens clothing. The unisex clothing, clothing worn by both sexes, is a result of this movement coupled with the sexual revolution that was taking place at the same time.

Girls turned to pants because they preferred the long, clean, liberating line. Boys wore embroidered shirts and beads because peasant embroidery and bright colors offered a liberation from the notion of what had been masculine taste for 150 years. Womens underwear went from wired bras to no bras at all or stretchy elastic bras with little or no support. The tight 1950s girdles with garters and nylon stockings that ended mid-thigh, were knocked into history by the comfortable one-piece nylon pantyhose. The Peace Movement Third The Peace Movement (or anti-Vietnam War Movement.) The Vietnam War was not anywhere as popular or supported as the two world wars had been. This war had the opposite effect on the country; instead of pulling the country together to save

resources, the country was pulled apart. Everyone took sides. The teenagers who revolted against the war and the established way of living, and working were called hippies. The hippie dress was a throw back to the beatniks of the 1950s. It was a casual, sometimes sloppy dress. The main focus was selfexpression. Whatever you wanted to wear, you wore. The hippies were not a majority of the teenagers, it should be noted, although some of the fashions spilled into the mainstream teen fashion. 60s British Invasion The most memorable fashion details of this era would be bell bottoms, miniskirts, and platform shoes. Others include the A-line skirt and dress, boots, and the Mod Look brought to

the United States by the Beatles and other musical groups. It was called the British invasion but it wasnt a reference to the military, but rather an invasion of American culture. The music, fashion, hairstyles, and make-up, to name a few were transferred across the Atlantic and took the 60s by storm. The Invention of the MINI skirt The mini was one fashion that hit early in

the 60s. It was the design of Mary Quant from Wales. She is regarded as the mother of the mini and high boots; shoulder bags and the poor boysweater. Pop and Mod were terms also borrowed from the British to describe fashion of this time. Another word used to describe the 60s is psychedelic. It was at least true for the colors and fabrics of that time. Floral patterns reflected the flower power theme of the hippie movement. Daisies, mums, and other flowers adorned everything from fabrics to wallpaper, from busses to vans. The colors were bright and bold.

Mary Quant The Calm of the Sixties Jacqueline O. Kennedy also stood out at this time to represent a more conservative fitted dress favored by many women. Events that changed Time: Vietnam War (1961-1975, American Involvement)

Movies about the 60s Breakfast at Tiffanys* Forest Gump 1970s SHOES For women: platforms and clogs. For men soft leather or leather with contrasting designs.

1970s Fashions in the 70s were extremely flexible. Most people dressed to identify with their particular lifestyle rather than fit into any fashion mold sent from Paris or anywhere else. Man-made fibers had progressed due to the high tech of the day. Polyester, that had been developed as early as 1939 and shelved until after the war, was a very popular fiber. It was blended with natural fibers giving the fabric the advantages of both fiber groups.

Some mens suits were fashioned in 100% polyester and marketed as the wash and wear suit. It was called the leisure suit and had a brief moment in time. It was very casual with buttons down the front, patch pockets, and bell bottoms. It was comfortable and easy to care for, as well as being wrinkle-resistant. 1970s The hippie influence was still seen in bright beads, embroidery on shirts, Levi pants and jackets, and tiedyed fabrics. Long hair was a hot topic; first seen as a sign of rebellion, and later accepted as fashionable, in moderation. Sideburns were worn long; beards and

moustaches were popular for both teenagers and their parents. Bee Gees Disco Fever and the Bell Bottom Teen styles were extreme. Pants were worn skin tight; hip hugger pants and skirts were worn with hip belts; a wide bell bottom style was popular n pant legs and sleeves. In the early 70s cuffs on trouser style pants for both men and women were reintroduced. Pant legs got wider and wider and were worn long enough to cover the shoe and scrape the floor. Platform shoes got higher

and higher with very chunky heels. 1970s Hair Hair for teenage girls the longer and straighter the better. Orange juice and soup cans were recycled into curlers to straighten out hopelessly wavy or curly hair. If the cans didnt work, then girls tried to iron their hair straight. Full bangs were worn long enough to cover the eyebrows, but not long enough to merge with the false eyelashes. From Conservative to Dramatic

Angel sleeves shown below are yards of fabric added on the sleeve for a dramatic look. In contrast, cardigans Are also in style during This time, especially on Mr. Rodgers! Movies that represent the 70s Brady Bunch 1980s

The fitness craze of the late 1970s brought a major change to the athletic clothing industry. Spandex was in; comfort and function were paramount. Men and women hit the gyms, spas, and athletic centers in droves creating a big market for athletic clothes that were not only functional but attractive and flattering. Lycra in bright colors worn with leggings and thick socks pushed down to the ankles in puddles, was the preferred fabric for aerobic exercises. The old gym shoe was replaced with 100 or more different kinds of specialized sports shoes. Whatever you planned to do, there was a special shoe to do it in. 1980s Working Girl

During the 1980s many women continued in or joined the work force. In order to be taken seriously by some, women needed a better fashion image at he office. The power suit was designed. It was a broad-shouldered lapel jacket worn with a white or light colored blouse (feminine but not too sexy or lacy) a skirt was worn with the jacket. Pants were seen as too casual. The power color for the power suit could be navy, black, gray, burgundy, but not brown. Pump shoes were appropriate; not too high for the heels but not completely flat either. 1980s Look

Colors in womens dresses were very rich; fabrics were fluid and flowing. Rayon, improved by new technology during the 70s was a very popular fabric. Ramie was a popular natural fabric added to cotton or acrylic for luster. The oversized shirt, sweater, and sweatshirt look was in. Some were huge through the shoulders, bustline, and waist, and narrowed to the thighs. Some tops were worn long and belted. 80sThe Stars Shine Again Fashions focused on

many music stars styles. Rock star, Madonna, release a video in 1985 wearing ripped jeans, lace, and lacy bustier. That launched the camisole craze worn with jeans, pants, or skirts and jackets. Michael Jackson was a hit with his breakdancing and one gloved hand.

80s - Couture The fashion industry became more international. Many designers turned out up to 20 collections a year. Mass-market fashion and catalogs got much better. Couturiers decided to rip themselves off for a change and started a score of less expensive lines. AIDS thinned out many talented fashion designers. 80s Still More Comfort Wear Day-Glo Body Glove answered womens request for walking and running wear.

Reeboks became public transport. The bodysuit made a comeback, focusing on a trim torso, wide shoulders, trip waist and hips. Jane Fonda creates designer sweats for her aerobic workouts. 80s - Brand Names Brands began to cover all clothing. The name on apparel was usually more important than the item itself. Guess? Jeans hit the stores in 1981. Swatch watches hit big in 1983.

The first Benetton shop opens in the U.S. 80s Looking towards a Princess The Princess of Wales, Dianna was the worlds top cover girl. 80s Textiles & Prints The early 80s were concerned with the environment, natural fabrics like cashmere and cotton were very popular. Real furs were banned or shunned by

many. Later 80s brought a desire for man-made rayon and the acetates. T-shirts were printed with animal prints, OP art designs, puff paints, sequins and fringe. Blue denim shirts and jeans, western details, jeans and blanket coats were great. Ethnic prints, nautical styles and country prints were big the last half of the decade. Mens ties sprouted floral pattern and bold bright colors. Shorts became a year round style using fabrics like denim and corduroy and are worn both by guys and girls. 80s Fashion Victim & The European

V It would be hard to understand the woman of the 80s by looking at the fashions of the time. There were power suits on one hand and very sexy, frivolous fashions on the other. Dont forget the athletic attire and casual at-home clothes. This was the decade when women wanted it all; husband, children, career. And time for self expression. All of these needs required special clothes Shoulders were severely padded in the mid 80s. Shoulder pads appeared in everything; blouses, sweaters, robes, tshirts, and dresses. Exaggerated lapels and flared jackets were also stylish.

1980s - the HAIR! The bigger the better would explain the hair of this period. Hairspray and ratting were an everyday need to obtain the height of the time. Bangs were very popular and often lifted many inches above the scalp. Crimping hair was very popular as well.

Movies from the 80s Some Kind of Wonderful* Pretty in Pink* 1990s A-Line Like the sixties any length of skirt was in. Long flowing a-line skirts become fashionable again. The 90s borrows fashions from the 60s and 70s especially.

Platforms return! Bell-bottoms and flares are back! The stone-washed look of the 80s turns into a worn, dirty look in the 90s. 90s Shoe Obsession Shoes are bought for every purpose. The decade starts with a natural carefree

Birkenstock and comfortable sport shoes and ends with platforms and Mary Janes. 90s Attack of the Cell Phone Cell phones become very inexpensive and everyone starts to buy in. They are not only for communication but become an accessory and have their own accessories! Bags and purses are created to carry the new found

necessity. 90s The Bare Midriff Shirts are cut short and the hip huggers of the sixties return. This time the hip huggers leave skin to be seen. The fifties are seen in the return of clam diggers now called capris.

Movies from the 90s Clueless* Shes All That* Fashion Predictions What predictions can be made about the years to come? What trends are already beginning? 2000s With the decade just beginning it is difficult to predict exactly what will

happen. One prediction is that black will remain to be seen! 2000s A retro look has begun mixing hits of the past and regurgitating them in styles for today. Trends show that we will most likely borrow several fads from the 80s. Proof of this prediction is seen in large hoop earrings,

the return of the more fitted leg, pleats, gathers and ruffles in shirts. Bibliography

Cotehardie & HouppelandeHomepage, http://www.pipcom.com/~tempus/cotelande/index.html, 2 Dec 2003. article(s) > le costume, http://www.encyclo.voila.fr/cgi-bin/doc? id=ni_1459.26&type=2&page=0 1966 Stark Raving Mod!, http://www.geocities.com/FashionAvenue/5362/The Sixties by Arthur Markham Timeline of costume historyhttp://www.costumes.org/pages/timelinepages/timeline.htm The History of Fashion and Dress,http://www.costumes.org/pages/fashiondress/18thCent.htm http://www.fashion-era.com/flapper_fashion_1920's.htm#The%20Flapper State University College Dept. Of Human Ecology, Fashion 224 History Of Costume 1910's, http://members.tripod.com/fash224/1910.html, A Briefe History of the Codpiece , http://www.onr.com/user/steveh/cods.htm

Abadeha, the Philippine Cinderella, by Myrna J. de la Paz. Los Angeles: Pazific Queen, 1991 Ashpet: an Appalachian Tale, retold by Joanne Compton, illustrated by Kenn Compton. Holiday House, 1994. Baba Yaga and Vasilisa the Brave, as told by Marianna Mayer, illustrated by K. Y. Craft. Morrow Junior Books, 1994. (Russian) Billy Beg and his Bull: an Irish Tale, retold by Ellin Greene, illustrated by Kimberly Bulcken Root. Holiday House, 1994. Boots and the Glass Mountain, by Claire Martin. Dial Books, 1992. (Norway) Chinye: a West African Folk Tale, retold by Obi Onyefulu; illustrated by Evie Safarewicz, 1994. Cinder Edna, by Ellen Jackson, illustrated by Kevin O'Malley. Lothrop, 1994. Cinder-Elly, by Frances Minters, illustrated by G. Brian Karas. Viking, 1994. (Rap version) Cinderella, adapted from Perrault's Cendrillon by John Fowles; illustrated by Sheilah Beckett. Little Brown, 1974. Cinderella, or, The Little Glass Slipper,a free translation from the French of Chales Perrault, illustrated by Marcia Brown. Scribner, 1954 (Caldecott medal winner) Cinderella, retold by David Delamare. Simon & Schuster, 1993. (Illustrations are Venetian inspired. The prince is named Fidelio) Cinderella, illustrated by Paul Galdone. McGraw-Hill, 1978.

Cinderella, retold from The Brothers Grimm and illustrated by Nonny Hogrogian. Greenwillow Books, 1981. Cinderella, retold by Amy Ehrlich; illustrated by Susan Jeffers. Dial Books for Young Readers, 1985. (From the Charles Perrault version) Cinderella, illustrated by Roberto Innocenti. Creative Education, 1983. (From the Charles Perrault version; illustrations set in the 1920's) Cinderella, by Barbara Karlin; illustrated by James Marshall. Little Brown, 1989. Cinderella, illustrated by Moira Kemp, 1981. Cinderella, or, The Little Glass Slipper, illustrated by Errol Le Cain. Bradbury Press, 1972. (Charles Perrault) Cinderella: from the Opera by Rossini, written and illustrated by Beni Montresor. Knopf, 1965. Cinderella, retold by C.S. Evans; illustrated by Arthur Rackham. Knopf, 1993. (Originally published in 1919 by Heinemann) Cinderella, translated by Anne Rogers (from the Grimm version), illustrated by Otto Svend. Larousse, 1978. Cinderella, by William Wegman, with Carole Kismaric and Marvin Heiferman Hyperion, 1993. (Told with photos of costumed Weimaraners) Cinderella Penguin, or, The Little Glass Flipper, by Janet Perlman, 1992. The Cinderella Rebus Book, Ann Morris, 1989. Cinderella's Stepsister, and, Cinderella: the Untold Story, as told by Russell Shorto, illustrated by T. Lewis. Carol Pub. Group, 1990. (A standard version back-to-back with a version by the "evil" stepsister)

The Egyptian Cinderella, by Shirley Climo, illustrated by Ruth Heller. HarperCollins, 1989. Ellen Foster by Kaye Gibbons. Vintage Contemporaries, 1987. (See Melinda Franklin's article)

The Enchanted Anklet: A Cinderella Story from India translated and adapted by Lila Mehta, illustrated by Neela Chhaniara. Toronto: Lilmur, 1985. The Glass Slipper, by Eleanor and Herbert Farjeon, illustrated by Hugh Stevenson. Wingate, 1946. (A novel-length version) The Golden Slipper: a Vietnamese Legend, by Darrell Lum, illustrated by Makiko Nagano. Troll, 1994. In the Land of Small Dragon: A Vietnamese Folktale, told by Dang Manh Kha to Ann Nolan Clark, illustrated by Tony Chen. Viking Press, 1979. Kao and the Golden Fish: a Folktale from Thailand, as remembered by Wilai Punpattanakul-Crouch retold by Cheryl Hamada, illustrated by Monica Liu. Chidren's Press, 1993.

Korean Cinderella, story edited by Edward B. Adams, illustrations by Dong Ho Choi. Seoul International Tourist Pub. Co., 1983. The Korean Cinderella, by Shirley Climo, 1993. Lily and the Wooden Bowl, Alan Schroeder, illustrated by Yoriko Ito. Doubleday, 1994. (Japan) Little Firefly: an Algonquin Legend, written and adapted by Terri Cohlene, illustrated by Charles Reasoner. Rourke Corp., 1990. Moss Gown, by William D. Hooks, illustrated by Donald Carrick. Clarion Books, 1987. (Southern U.S.) Mufaro's Beautiful Daughters: An African Tale, by John Steptoe. Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1987. (Zimbabwe) Nomi and the Magic Fish: a Story from Africa, by Phumla, illustrated by Carole Byard. Doubleday, 1972. (Zulu) Prince Cinders, by Babette Cole, 1987. Princess Furball, by Charlotte Huck; illustrated by Anita Lobel. Scholastic, 1989. Queen of the May, by Steven Kroll, illustrated by Patience Brewster. Holiday House, 1993 The Rough-Face Girl, by Rafe Martin, illustrated by David Shannon. Putnam, 1992. (Algonquin Indian) Sidney Rella and the Glass Sneaker, by Bernice Myers. Macmillan, 1985. Silver Woven in My Hair, by Shirley Rousseau Murphy. Atheneum, 1977. (Novel-length) Sootface: an Ojibwa Cinderella Story, retold by Robert D. San Souci, illustrated by Daniel San Souci. Doubleday Book for Young Readers, 1994.

The Starlight Cloak, retold by Jenny Nimmo, pictures by Justin Todd. Dial Book for Young Readers, 1993. The Talking Eggs: a Folktale from the American South, by Robert San Souci; illustrated by Jerry Pinkney. Dial Books for Young Readers, 1989. Tam Cam: The Vietnamese Cinderella Story by The Goi. Tattercoats, retold by Margaret Greaves, illustrated by Margaret Chamberlain. Clarkson N. Potter, 1990. Tattercoats, edited by Joseph Jacobs; illustrated by Margot Tomes. Putnam, 1989. Tattercoats: an Old English Tale, by Flora Annie Steel; illustrated by Diane Goode. Bradbury Press, 1976. The Turkey Girl: a Zuni Cinderella, retold by Penny Pollock; illustrated by Ed Young. Little, Brown, 1995. Vasalisa and her Magic Doll, adapted and illustrated by Rita Grauer. Philomel Books, 1994. (Russia) Vasilisa the Beautiful, translated from the Russian by Thomas Whitney; illustrated by Nonny Hogrogian. Macmillan, 1970. Vasilissa the Beautiful: A Russian Folktale, adapted by Elizabeth Winthrop, illustrated by Alexander Koskkin. HarperCollins, 1991. When the Nightingale Sings, by Joyce Carol Thomas. HarperCollins, 1992. (Novel-length) Wishbones: A Folktale from China, retold by Barbara Ker Wilson; illustrated by Meilo So. Bradbury, 1993. Yeh-Shen, a Cinderella Tale from China, by Ai-Ling Louie; illustrated by Ed Young. Philomel Books, 1982.

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