Cuyahoga Falls CSD Master Facilities Plan

Cuyahoga Falls CSD Master Facilities Plan September 2019 Master Facilities Plan The Cuyahoga Falls City School District Master Facilities Planning Committee: Consisted of community members, staff and parents Challenged to develop a long-range Master Facilities Plan The goal is to provide positive learning environments for both students and staff within our school district Establishing a solid master plan ensures investments are well-managed and planned to support the success of the students and to build upon the Cuyahoga Falls legacy for generations to come

CFCSD has been in discussions with Ohio Facilities Construction Commission (OFCC) formerly the Ohio School Facilities Commission (OSFC) for more than 15 years; Project began in the summer of 2018 with the selection of ThenDesign Architecture (TDA) as our pre-bond architects Establishing the Need Learning today calls for creativity, communication, collaboration, and critical thinking. Our efforts to infuse these skills are hampered by our aged facilities

In recent years, students are leaving Cuyahoga Falls to attend other districts via open enrollment or complete relocation of their families The cost of operating and maintaining our aging buildings continues to rise, having a negative impact on our financial resources Establishing the Need Inequities exist across the district. Classroom sizes vary in the same grade levels creating disparity in learning.

Revitalization of downtown and Portage Crossing areas show this community can embrace change and grow Tour of each of our current buildings Assessme nt of Existing Footprint Review assessments done by TDA and Hammond Construction the regional

representative for OFCC Compare the cost to renovate vs. the cost to rebuild Rule of two-thirds: If the cost to renovate is more than 67% of the cost to rebuild, recommendation is to rebuild. Development Plan Visioning session

Over 100 parents, staff, students & community members contributed Ten-year enrollment study was completed by Future Think Year five is used to determine building size and cost

Weekly meetings Tours of North Ridgevilles 3-8 building and North Olmsteds 6-12 building North Olmsted 6-12 School The Project A new, state-of-the-art 6-12 facility To be built on the existing Bolich/ Newberry site Will contain flexible classrooms

with advanced technology 1,400-seat performing arts center New 5,000-seat stadium for football, soccer, and track How We Get There Once passed, the sequence of events will include: Demo Newberry Elementary Relocate Laybourne Field and

construct a new 5,000-seat stadium to house football, soccer & track Construct the 6-8 grade portion of the building Move all middle school students into THEIR brand-new portion of the facility Demo BMS Construct the 9-12 grade portion of the new facility complete with a new 1,400 seat performing arts center Move remaining students into THEIR brand-new facility

The Rest Segment One of a two segment Master Facilities Plan Planning Committee will likely discuss Segment Two (PK-5) as Segment One nears completion It is important to note the current Cuyahoga Falls High School (CFHS) as well as Roberts Middle School (RMS) will remain and be used as swing space and optional use for Segment Two

The Finances The co-funded portion of the project includes: New 6-12 facility on Bolich site $88,473,984 Abate/Demo Newberry $381,616 Abate/Demo Bolich $862,513 Total $89,718,113 State Share (37%)

Local Share (63%) $33,195,702 $56,522,411 The Finances The total project will include the following locally funded initiatives (LFIs): Phasing Costs (LFI) student transitions $1,200,000 4% Escalation for Market Conditions $3,588,725

New 1,400 seat Performing Arts Center (PAC) $9,000,000 New 5,000 seat stadium $9,300,000 Building Material Enhancement $1,000,000 Total LFI Cost $24,088,725 The Finances The total project cost, including locally funded initiatives, will be:

New 6-12 facility on Bolich site $88,473,983 Abate/Demo Newberry $381,616 Abate/Demo Bolich $862,513 Phasing Costs (LFI) $1,200,000 4% Escalator for Market Conditions (LFI) $3,588,724 New 1,400 seat PAC (LFI) $9,000,000 New 5,000 seat stadium (LFI) $9,300,000 Building Material Enhancement (LFI)

$1,000,000 Total Project Cost $113,806,838 State Share - $33,195,702 Total Local Cost - $80,611,136 The Finances To generate $80,611,136 The terms of the bonds will be 36 years at 4.50% which yields an estimated millage rate of 5.33 mills. This is only 0.35 mills more than the ballot issue in 2015 ($1/mo./$100K) with

6th graders A performing arts center Multi-purpose stadium OFCC requires an additional 0.5 mills to be placed into a maintenance fund. Additional 4.0 mills (~$3,082,651/yr.) for a 10-year period 3.42% average increase in the cost of doing business from FY12 to FY19 Will not be in the new facility for at least four years Based on $100,000 of property valuation, the cost to the taxpayer will be:

9.83 mills = $344.05/year or, $28.67/month or, $0.95/day The Finances The benefits Increased enrollment Neilson, C. and Zimmerman, S. (2011), The Effect of School Construction on Test Scores, School Enrollment, and Home Prices, IZA, Bonn, Germany The authors, from Yale University, found the following:

Housing prices and neighborhood public school enrollment also responded positively to school construction. Elementary and middle school construction raised home values by 1.3 percent per $10,000 of perstudent expenditure, and the number of school zone residents attending public school by up to 4.4 percent per $10,000. The benefits Increased student achievement Neilson, C. and Zimmerman, S. (2011), The Effect of School Construction on Test Scores, School Enrollment, and Home Prices, IZA, Bonn, Germany The authors, from Yale University, found the following:

We find strong evidence that the school construction program led to sustained gains in reading scores for elementary and middle school students. Trends in reading scores are flat in the years leading up to construction, but turn upwards in the year of construction and continue to increase for at least the next six years. By the sixth year following the year of construction, student scores rise by 0.027 standard deviations for each $10,000 of per-student construction expenditure, this corresponds to a total score gain of 0.21 standard deviations. These gains are large, but not implausibly so; roughly speaking, they are of similar magnitude to those experienced by students who enroll in high-preforming charter schools.

The benefits Increased property values Neilson, C. and Zimmerman, S. (2011), The Effect of School Construction on Test Scores, School Enrollment, and Home Prices, IZA, Bonn, Germany The authors, from Yale University, found the following: If families only valued infrastructure insofar as it improved education production, this would imply that raising school value added by 0.1 standard deviations would raise neighborhood home prices by 4.7 percent, and enrollment of

neighborhood residents in public schools by 16.2 percent. The benefits additional evidence Lafortune, J. and Schonholzer, D. (2017), Does New School Construction Impact Student Test Scores and Attendance?, California Policy Lab Our findings indicate that 4 years of attending a newly constructed school leads to an increase of 5% of standard deviation in English test scores, and an increase of 10% of a standard deviation in math scores Notably, students a newly constructed schools also attend an average of 4 additional days per academic year.

These results suggest that new facilities lead to student gains in non-cognitive measures in addition to gains in standardized test scores. Frequently Asked Questions How will 2020 reappraisal impact taxes? While property values may increase, the amount of money the school district receives on outside voted millage remains the same. The effective millage rate of each property tax issue is reduced. By Ohio law, CFCSD collects 4.9 mills of inside (Ohio law mandates that 10 mills shared between municipalities) millage that ebbs and flows with

district property valuation. Reappraisal Class I Real Estate Inside Millage 2016 Tax Year (payable in 2017) 2017 Tax Year (Reappraisal Year; payable in 2018) $100,000,000 $110,000,000 (increase of 10%)

5 mills 5 mills (no reduction) $500,000 $550,000 Inside millage is not subject to HB 920. As a result, revenue from inside millage results in an increase in tax receipts. Reappraisal

Class I Real Estate - Outside Millage 2016 Tax Year (payable in 2017) 2017 Tax Year (Reappraisal Year; payable in 2018) $100,000,000 $110,000,000 (increase of 10%) 26 mills (voted millage) 23.63 mills (subject to HB 920)

$2,600,000 $2,600,000 chool district receives no increase or decrease in tax revenue on voted millage (outside millage n carryover property (same class for two consecutive years) due to the effects of HB 920 Reappraisal What if the taxpayers property increases by a greater percent than the district average? 2016 Tax Year (payable in 2017)

2017 Tax Year (Reappraisal Year; payable in 2018) $90,000 $103,500 (increase of 15%) $31,500 (Assessed value at 35%) $36,225 (New assessed value at 35%)

26 mills 23.63 mills (New effective rate for Class I) $819.00 (Tax due) $856.23 (Taxbecause due 4.55% increase) The homeowner will pay more taxes than

last year the home increased in value more than the district average of 10%. Reappraisal What if the taxpayers property increases by a LESSER percent than the district average? 2016 Tax Year (payable in 2017) 2017 Tax Year (Reappraisal Year; payable in 2018)

$90,000 $94,500 (increase of 5%) $31,500 (Assessed value at 35%) $33,075 (New assessed value at 35%) 26 mills 23.63 mills (New effective rate for Class I)

$819.00 (Tax due) $781.56 (Tax due 4.57% reduction) The homeowner will pay less taxes than last year because the home increased in value less than the district average of 10%.

North Ridgeville 3-8 Academic Center North Ridgeville 3-8 Academic Center North Ridgeville 3-8 Academic Center North Ridgeville 3-8 Academic

Center North Olmsted 612 School North Olmsted 612 School North Olmsted 6-12 High School Entrance Middle School Entrance

North Olmsted 612 School North Olmsted 6-12 North Olmsted 6-12 North Olmsted 6-12 North Olmsted 612 School

North Olmsted 6-12 Frequently Asked Questions Have not maintained current buildings, why do we think the schools will improve their record on new buildings? Why did they let the existing buildings get so bad? Current buildings are being maintained as necessary. Due to their age, repairs are frequent and expensive. For example: New parking lots at Price, Preston, Lincoln and Richardson; New roofs at Bolich, DeWitt, Silver Lake, and part of CFHS; New boilers at CFHS; HVAC in all buildings;

Security throughout the district, both inside and outside; Kitchen equipment in all buildings; We will continue to address issues as they emerge in our existing buildings as funds permit. With new construction, 0.5 mills or approximately $385,000/year is dedicated to a maintenance fund which will dedicate funds for future repairs of the facility. Frequently Asked Questions 4.5% interest rate on the bonds? How does that work versus millage? Bonds are similar to a mortgage. The cost of the

project is spread across a 36-year period of time and is financed at 4.5%. Millage is determined on the average amount to repay the bonds versus the districts total property valuation. Using a Equal Principal method, the amount principal paid each year is $2,239,198.22 and the amount of interest paid is steadily reduced. In this case, the total repayment (principal and interest = $147,719,906) divided by the term (36 years) divided by the current valuation in the district ($770,662,690) which is an estimated millage rate of 5.33 mills.

Frequently Asked Questions What is the estimated square footage of proposed building? How does that compare with current HS + Roberts + Bolich square footage? Existing square footage: CFHS = 304,476 Bolich = 96,768 Roberts = 75,249 Total = 476,493 We are estimating the new building to be approximately 370,000 square feet. The difference is due to common or shared spaces which will allow district operations to be more efficient

For example, cafeterias, gymnasiums, mechanical rooms, media centers, offices, etc. Frequently Asked Questions What will be the effect on busing? Will the district need to purchase new buses to accommodate transporting students from other areas? Yes, we will have to make adjustments in transportation. While state law only mandates transportation outside a two-mile radius for students in grades K-8, we have no intention to transport a 6 th grade student while leaving his/her 10th grade sibling behind. Succinctly, we intend to provide transportation for students in grades 9-12 as well.

We will examine the application of state law with addition of high school ridership and make necessary adjustments for safety and efficiency. As a result, by state law we will need to offer transportation to students attending non-public schools within a thirty-minute radius of the public building which the student would normally attend unless it is declared impractical based on criteria provided in law. How many buses is under investigation; however, we are estimating four to five additional buses.

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