Colonial Games and Toys - TeacherTube

Early American, Nursery Rhymes, and Tongue Twisters Mother Goose: The first known collection of stories under the name "Mother Goose" was by Charles Perrault in 1698, it was a book of ten fairy tales and was titled Tales from the Past with Morals. His book of ten fairy tales was under the frontispiece picture of an old woman telling stories to children and a cat appeared a subtitle for the book: Contes de ma mre l'oye, or "Tales from My Mother Goose."

The Sisters who Dropped From their Mouths Diamonds and Toads The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods Little Red Riding-Hood Blue Beard

The Master Cat, or Puss in Boots The Fairy Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slipper Riquet of the Tuft Little Thumb Mother Goose 1697 The first collection of stories to bear the name "Mother Goose" was produced by Charles Perrault in 1697. His book of ten fairy tales was entitled Tales from the Past with Morals, and under the frontispiece picture of an old woman telling stories to children and a cat appeared a subtitle for the book: Contes de ma mre l'oye, or "Tales from My Mother Goose."

A subtitle, translated from French, is Tales from My Mother Goose. It was translated into English and published in 1729 as Mother Goose's Fairy Tales. Mother Goose 1760 - 1787 A Much more successful version was published in 1760, by John Newberry, as Mother Goose's Melody, he also published two other children's books, The Top Book of All and Gammer Gurton's Garland. In 1787 (the year the U.S. Constitution was signed) Isaiah Thomas published the first American edition, titled Mother Goose's Melody or Sonnets for the Cradle. This version included such favorites as Little Tommy Tucker and Jack and Jill, along

with half a hundred others. Later editors have greatly expanded Thomas' modest collection, but the old tales and rhymes from European antiquity continue amidst collections of as many as 700 rhymes, stories, and riddles. Since then there have been many versions, often claiming to be copies of the original, the one and only &c, most are illustrated and some are quite large collections with hundreds of rhymes and stories. Nursery Rhymes Colonial Children, like children today, also told nursery

rhymes. Do you know what some of these nursery rhymes really mean? Old King Cole Old King Cole Was a merry old soul, And a merry old soul was he; And he called for his pipe,

And he called for his bowl, And he called for his fiddlers three. And every fiddler had a fine fiddle, And a very fine fiddle had he. "Tweedle dee, tweedle dee," said the fiddlers, " Oh, there's none so rare As can compare With Old King Cole and his fiddlers three!" Little Boy Blue Little boy blue, come, blow up your horn : The sheep's in the meadow, the

cow's in the corn Where's the little boy that tends the sheep? He's under the haycock, fast asleep. Go wake him, go wake him ! Oh, no, not I! For if I do he will certainly cry. Brandy Legs As I was going to sell my eggs, I met a man with bandy legs,

Bandy legs and crooked toes : I tripped up his heels, and he fell on his nose. There was a little man There was a little man, and he had a little gun; And his bullets were made of lead, lead, lead: He shot David Sprigg through the

middle of his wig, And knocked it right off his head, head, head. Tom, Tom. the pipers son Tom, Tom, the piper's son, Stole a pig, and away he run! The pig was eat, and Tom was beat, And Tom ran crying down the

street. Hark, hark, hark! Hark, hark, hark! The dogs do bark, The beggars are coming to town : Some in rags, Some in tags, And some in velvet gowns. There was an old man

There was an old man, And he had a calf ; And that's half. He took him out of the stall, And put him on the wall; And that's all. Two blind men There were two blind men went to see

Two cripples run a race; The bull did fight the bumble-bee, And scratched him on the face. Pussy sits beside the fire. Pussy sits beside the fire. How can she be fair? In walks a little doggy: " Pussy, are you there ? So, so, dear Mistress Pussy: Pray tell me how you do."

"Thank you, thank you, little dog, I'm very well just now." Please Porridge Hot Pease porridge hot, Pease porridge cold; Pease porridge in the pot Nine days old. Some like it hot, Some like it cold, Some like it in the pot

Nine days old. Bobby Shaftos Bobby Shafto's gone to sea, With silver buckles on his knee; When he comes back he'll marry me, Pretty Bobby Shafto. Bobby Shafto's fat and fair, Combing down his yellow hair: He's my love for evermore, Pretty Bobby Shafto.

Rock-a-by baby Rock-a-by baby, thy cradle is green;Father's a nobleman, mother's a queen; And Betty's a lady, and wears a gold ring; And Johnny's a drummer, and drums for the king. Crooked Man There was a crooked

man, and he went a crooked mile; He found a crooked sixpence against a crooked stile; He bought a crooked cat, which caught a crooked mouse; And they all lived together in a little crooked house. Hey diddle diddle Hey diddle diddle, the

cat and the fiddle, The cow jumped over the moon ; The little dog laughed to see such sport, And the dish ran after the spoon. Bramble Bush There was a man in our town, And he was wondrous wise :

He jumped into a bramblebush, And scratched out both his eyes. And when he saw his eyes were out, With all his might and main, He jumped into another bush, And scratched them in again. Sing a Song of sixpence Sing a song of sixpence, a pocket full of rye, Four and twenty blackbirds baked in a pie: When the pie was opened, the birds began to sing; Was not that a dainty dish to set

before the king? The king was in the parlor, counting out his money; The queen was in the kitchen, eating bread and honey ; The maid was in the garden, hanging out the clothes; There came a little blackbird, and nipped off her nose. There was a man There was a man, and he had nought, And robbers came to rob him ; He crept up to the chimneypot, And then they thought they had him. But he got down on

t'other side, And then they could not find him: He ran fourteen miles in fifteen days, And never looked behind him. Little Robin Redbreast Little Robin Redbreast sat upon a tree; Up went a Pussy-cat, and down went he ; Down came the Pussy-cat, away Robin ran ; Says little Robin Redbreast, " Catch me

if you can." Little Robin Redbreast jumped upon the wall; Pussy-cat jumped after him, and got a nice fall; Little Robin chirped and sang, and what did Pussy say? Pussy-cat said, " Mew, mew!" and Robin flew away. Bonny Lass! Bonny lass! bonny

lass ! will you be mine ? You shall neither wash dishes, nor serve the wine; But sit on a cushion, and sew up a seam ; And you shall have strawberries, sugar, and cream. There was a piper had a cow There was a piper had a

cow, And he'd no hay to give her: He took his pipe, and played a tune, " Consider, cow, consider." The cow considered very well; For she gave the piper a penny, That he might play the tune again Of " Corn rigs are bonnie." Baa, baa! Black sheep Baa, baa! black sheep,

have you any wool ? Yes, marry, have I, three bags full,-One for my master, and one for my dame, But none for the little boy who cries in the lane. There was an old woman who lived in a Shoe. There was an old woman who lived in a shoe; She had so many children, she didn't know what to do.

She gave them some broth without any bread; She whipped them all soundly, and sent them to bed. Humpty Dumpty Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall; Humpty Dumpty had a great fall: Threescore men, and threescore more, Can't place Humpty Dumpty as he was before.

Girls and boys come out to play Girls and boys, come out to play : The moon doth shine as bright as day. Leave your supper, leave your sleep, And come with your playfellows into the street. Come with a whoop; come with a call; Come with a good will, or not at all. When I was a little boy I lived by myself When I was a little boy I lived by myself,

And all the bread and cheese I got, I put upon the shelf: The rats and the mice did lead me such a life, I was forced to go to London, and buy me a wife; The streets were so broad, and the lanes were so narrow, I could not get my wife home without a wheelbarrow; The wheelbarrow broke, my wife got a fall; Down tumbled wheelbarrow, wife, and all.

Little Miss Muffit Little Miss Muffett She sat on a buffet, Eating of curds and whey: There came a black spider, And sat down beside her, Which frightened Miss Muffett away.

Lazy Tom Lazy Tom, with jacket blue, Stole his father's gouty shoe. The worst of harm that dad can wish him Is that his gouty shoe may fit him. Ding, dong, bell, Pussy's in the well

Ding, dong, bell, Pussy's in the well Who put her in? Little Johnny Green. Who pulled her out? Big Johnny Stout. What a naughty boy was that, To drown poor pussy-cat, Who never did him any harm, But killed the mice in his father's barn ! Twenty Four Tailors

Four and twenty tailors went to kill a snail; The best man among them durst not touch her tail; She put out her horns like a little Kyloe eow: Run, tailors, run, or she'll kill you all e'en now. One misty, moisty morning One misty, moisty

morning, When cloudy was the weather, I chanced to meet an old man Clothed all in leather. He began to compliment, And I began to grin, " How do you do ? " and " How do you do ? " And " How do you do ? " again. Who comes here?

Who comes here? A grenadier. What do you want? A pot of beer. Where's your money? I've forgot. Get you gone, you drunken sot! Hickory Dickory Dock Hickory, dickory, dock, The mouse ran up the clock;

The clock struck one, The mouse ran down; Hickory, dickory, dock. Old Woman There was an old woman tossed up in a blanket, Seventy times as high as the moon : Where she was going, I couldn't but ask it, For in her hand she carried a broom.

" Old woman, old woman, old woman," quoth I, " Oh ! whither, oh ! whither, oh ! whither, so high ? " "To brush the cobwebs off the sky! And I will be back again by and by." To market, to market, to buy a fat pig To market, to market, to buy a fat pig; Home again, home again,

jiggety jig. To market, to market, to buy a fat hog; Home again, home again, jiggety jog Little Jack Horner Little Jack Horner sat in the corner, Eating a Christmas pie: He put in his thumb, and he took out a plum,

And said, " What a good boy am I!" Jack Sprat Jack Sprat could eat no fat, His wife could eat no lean: Betwixt them both they cleared the plate, And licked the platter clean.

Jack and Jill Jack and Jill went up the hill, To fetch a pail of water; Jack fell down, and broke his crown, And Jill came tumbling after. Up Jack got, and home did trot As fast as he could caper; Jill had the job, to plaster his knob With vinegar and brown paper. To bed, to bed " To bed, to bed ! " says Sleepy-head ; " Let's stay awhile," says Slow; " Put on

the pot," says Greedy-gut, "We'll sup before we go." One, two, buckle my shoe One, two, buckle my shoe; Three, four, shut the door; Five, six, pick up sticks; Seven, eight, lay them straight; Nine, ten, a good fat hen; Eleven, twelve, who will delve? Thirteen,

fourteen, maids a-courting: Fifteen, sixteen, maids akissing; Seventeen, eighteen, maids a-waiting; Nineteen, twenty, my stomach's empty. Goosey. Goosey, gander Goosey, goosey, gander, Where shall I wander? Up stairs, down stairs, And in my lady's chamber: There I met an old man That

would not say his prayers; I took him by the left leg, And threw him down stairs. Sing, sing! What shall I sing? Sing, sing! What shall I sing? The cat's run away with the pudding-bag string. Do, do! What shall I do? The cat has bit it quite in

two. I had a little pony I had a little pony, His name was Dapple-gray: I lent him to a lady, To ride a mile away. She whipped him, she slashed him, She rode him through the mire: I would not lend my pony now For all the lady's hire.

Deedle deedle dumpling Deedle deedle dumpling, my son John, He went to bed with his stockings on, One stocking off, and one stocking on; Deedle deedle dumpling, my son John. Bye, baby bunting Bye, baby bunting : Daddy's gone a-

hunting, To get a little rabbit's skin To wrap the baby bunting in. Peter, Peter, pumpkin eater Peter, Peter, pumpkin-eater, Had a wife, and couldn't keep her: He put her in a pumpkin-shell, And there he kept her very well. Peter, Peter, pumpkin-eater, Had another, and didn't love her : Peter learned to

read and spell, And then he loved her very well. Hush-a-by, baby Hush-a-by, baby, on the tree top: When the wind blows, the cradle will rock; When the bough bends, the cradle will fall; Down will come baby, cradle, and all.

A cat came fiddling out of a barn A cat came fiddling out of a barn, With a pair of bagpipes under her arm: She could sing nothing but fiddle-dee-dee, The mouse has married the bumblebee. Pipe, cat, dance, mouse, We'll have a wedding at our good house. Taffy was a Welshman

Taffy was a Welshman, Taffy was a thief; Taffy came to my house, and stole a piece of beef. I went to Taffy's house, Taffy wasn't at home; Taffy came to my house, and stole a marrow-bone. I went to Taffy's house, Taffy was in bed ; I took the marrowbone, and beat about his head. Mary, Mary, quite contrary

Mary, Mary, quite contrary, How does your garden grow? Silver bells, and cockle shells, And pretty maids all in a row. Charley Loves Charley loves good cake and ale, Charley loves good

candy; Charley loves to kiss the girls When they are clean and handy. Ride, baby, ride! Ride, baby, ride! Pretty baby shall ride, And have a little puppy-dog tied to her side, And little pussycat tied to the other; And away she shall ride to see her grandmother,

To see her grandmother, To see her grandmother. Little Tommy Tucker Little Tommy Tucker, sing for your supper. What shall I sing? White bread and butter. How shall I cut it without any knife? How shall I marry without any wife?

There was a little man, And he wooed a little maid There was a little man, And he wooed a little maid; And he said, Little maid, will you wed, wed, wed? I have little more to say Than will you, yea or nay; For the least said is soonest mended, ded, ded. The little maid replied, Some say a little sighed, But what shall we have to eat, eat, eat?

Will the flame that you're so rich in Make the fire in the kitchen, Or the little god of Love turn the spit, spit, spit? Little Johnny Pringle had a little pig Little Johnny Pringle had a little pig; It was not very little, nor was it very big : As it was playing beneath the shed, In half a minute poor piggie was dead.

So Johnny Pringle sat down and cried; And Betty Pringle, she lay down and died. This is the history of one, two, and three, Johnny Pringle, Betty Pringle, and Piggie Wiggie. Man in the Moon The man in the moon Came down too soon, To inquire his way to Norwich: He went by the South,

And burnt his mouth With eating cold plum porridge. Victuals and drink! There was an old woman, and what do you think? She lived upon nothing but victuals and drink! Victuals and drink were the chief of her diet; And yet this old

woman could never be quiet. Three wise men of Gotham Three wise men of Gotham Went to sea in a bowl: And if the bowl had been stronger, My song had been longer; But so weak was the bowl,

They sank, every soul. Simple Simon Simple Simon met a pieman, going to the fair : Says Simple Simon to the pieman, " Let me taste your ware." Says the pieman to Simple Simon, " Show me first your penny." Says Simple Simon to the pieman, " Indeed, I have not any." Simple Simon went a-fishing, for to catch a whale: All the water he

had got was in his mother's pail. Simple Simon went to look if plums grew on a thistle: He pricked his fingers very much, which made poor Simon whistle. St. Ives As I was going to St. Ives, I met a man with seven wives! Every wife had seven sacks; Every sack had seven cats; Every cat had

seven kits. Kits, cats, sacks, and wives, How many were there going to St. Ives ? Answer to the Nursery Rhyme 7 wives 49 sacks 343 cats 2401 kits Total 2800 Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross

Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross, To see an old lady upon a white horse: Rings on her fingers, and bells on her toes, She will make music wherever she goes. Three children sliding on the ice Three children sliding on

the ice Upon a summer's day: As it fell out, they all fell in; The rest they ran away. Now, had these children been at home, Or sliding on dry ground, Ten thousand pounds to one penny, They had not all been drowned. Robin and Richard

Robin and Richard were two pretty men, They lay in bed till the clock struck ten ; Then up starts Robin, and looks at the sky: Oh, ho, brother Richard! the sun's very high. Once in my life I married a wife Once in my life I married a wife, And where do you think I found her

? On Gretna Green, in a velvet sheen, And I took up a stick to pound her. She jumped over a barberrybush, And I jumped over a timber: I showed her a gay gold ring, And she showed me her finger. Little Bo-peep Little Bo-peep has lost her sheep, And can't tell where to find them : Leave them alone, and they'll come home, And bring their tails behind them.

Little Bo-peep fell fast asleep, And dreamed she heard them bleating; But when she awoke, she found it a joke, For they were still a-fleeting. Then she took up her little crook, Determined for to find them; She found them indeed, but it made her heart bleed, For they'd left all their tails behind 'em! Pat a cake Pat a cake, pat a

cake, baker's man; So I will, master, as fast as I can. Pick it and pat it, and mark it with B, And put it in the oven for Willie and me. Handy, Spandy Handy Spandy, Jack-a-dandy, Loves plum-cake and sugar-candy:

He bought some at a candy-shop, And out he came, hop, hop, hop. Top Nursery Rhyme Spinning Twirly Tops No Strings or spring or ring or wing. It spins on its pedestal true. Just give it a twirl, then its off with a whirl.

And the effect will surely surprise you too. Nursery Rhymes Jack be nimble, Jack be quick Jack jump over the candlestick After dipping candles, a colonial woman would hang them from two long horizontal sticks to allow them to harden and cool. These sticks, and not the candles themselves, were

referred to as candle sticks. Polly put the kettle on, Polly put the kettle on, Polly put the kettle on, We'll all have tea. Sukey take it off again, Sukey take it off again, Sukey take it off again, They've all gone away Nursery Rhymes

Lucy Lockett lost her pocket, Sally Fisher found it, Not a penny was there in it Just a ribbon 'round it. Most colonial clothing did not have pockets in them. A colonial pocket was a detachable cloth bad used for holding pocket books (Wallets), sewing, and other things that girls and women would like to have on hand throughout the day. Pockets were tied around the waist with a tape, or ribbon, and they were often decorated with embroidery. London Bridge Instructions

This game has probably a "relative" in every country. The British one is "London Bridge is falling down". The game symbolizes the children's wish to grow up and become good and strong adults. Two taller kids are standing in front of each other, with their hands up, forming a sort of gate (or an arcade/ a vault). The others are moving in line through the gate, singing: London Bridge

London Bridge London Bridge is falling down, Falling down, falling down, London Bridge is falling down, My fair lady. How shall we build it up again, Up again, up again? How shall we build it up again,

My fair lady? We will build with wood and clay, Wood and clay, wood and clay, We will build with wood and clay, My fair lady. But wood and clay will wash away, Wash away, wash away, Wood and clay will wash away, My fair lady. We will build with iron and steel, Iron and steel, iron and steel, We will build with iron and steel, My fair lady.

But iron and steel will bend and break, Bend and break, bend and break,

But iron and steel will bend and break, My fair lady. We will build with silver and gold, Silver and gold, silver and gold, We will build with silver and gold, My fair lady. But silver and gold will be stolen away, Stolen away, stolen away, But silver and gold will be stolen away, My fair lady. We'll put a man to watch all night, Watch all night, watch all night, We'll put a man to watch all night, My fair lady.

Suppose the man would fall asleep, Fall asleep, fall asleep, Suppose the man would fall asleep, My fair lady. Take the key and lock him up, Lock him up, lock him up, Take the key and lock him up, My fair lady. Tongue Twisters Bluebirds bring bright berries. The skunk sat on a stump and thunk the stump stunk. But the stump thunk the skunk stunk.

She sheered six shabby sick sheep. Riddles 1. What flies up, but is always down? 2. When is a boy most like a bear? 3. What kind of room is not in a house? 4. What has teeth but cannot eat? 5. What has a tongue but cannot talk? 6. What has 3 feet but cannot walk? 7. What has a mouth but cannot talk? 8. What falls down but never gets hurt? 1. Goosefeathers. 2. When he is barefoot. 3. A mushroom. 4. A comb. 5. A shoe. 6. A yardstick. 7. A river. 8. Snow.

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